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Full text of "Annual report"

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Board of Selectmen: 

Seated (1-r) James R. Engel (Chairman), Charles J. Wayne 

Standing (1-r) Patrick J. McNally, William E. George, William I. Walton 



Cover: Sewage Sludge Composting Facility located at the end of 
Town Farm Road 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OF IPSWICH 

1991 



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1991 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Roster of Town Officials and Committees 2 

April 1, 1991 Annual Town Meeting 5 

Operating Budget 8 

November 4, 1991 Special Town Meeting 31 

Board of Selectmen 61 

Town Manager 61 

Department of Public Safety 63 

Police Department 63 

Fire Division 64 

Animal Control . 65 

Harbors 66 

Civil Defense 66 

Department of Public Works 67 

Public Works Divisions 67 

Solid Waste Advisory Committee 70 

Department of Code Enforcement 71 

Building 71 

Health 71 

Zoning Board of Appeals 72 

Department of Planning and Development 72 

Planning Board 72 

Conservation Commission 7 3 

Historical Commission 74 

Master Plan Commission 75 

Department of Human Services 7 6 

Recreation Department 76 

Council On Aging 77 

Department of Utilities 78 

Electric Department 78 

Water Division 79 

Sewer Division 79 

Ipswich Public Library 80 

Town Counsel 81 

Finance Department 82 

Accounting Office 82 

Treasurer/Collector 83 

Assessors Office 84 

Town Clerk 84 

Elections and Registrations 86 

Ipswich Arts Council 87 

Coastal Pollution Control Committee 88 

Hall-Haskell House Standing Committee 88 

Commuter Rail Committee 89 

Ipswich. Housing Authority 9 

School Department 91 

Town of Ipswich Revenue Sharing Handicapped Regulations . . . 101 

Financial Statements - Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1991 ... 103 



1991 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



E BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
James R. Engel, Ch 
William E. George 
Patrick J. McNally 
William I. Walton 
Charles J. Wayne 

E CONSTABLE 

Peter Dziadose 

E SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Cynthia Quinn, Ch. 
Jeffrey Simon 
David Pauley 
Norman Sheppard 
Lawrence Seidler 
Margot Sherwood 
Joseph Rogers 

E TOWN MODERATOR 
A. James Grimes 



1993 
1994 
1993 
1992 
1992 



1992 



1992 
1992 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1994 
1994 



1992 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
E2 Elected at Town Meeting 
Walter Pojasek 1993 
Constance Surpitski 1992 
Boyd Finch 1994 

03 Appointed by Moderator 
William Craft, Ch. 1994 
Alice Shurcliff 1992 
Jamie Fay 1993 

S Appointed by Selectmen 
Lawrence Pszenny 1992 
Leonard Heurlin 1993 
Geoffrey Hunt 1994 

E HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Catherine Cecil, Ch.1995 
Arthur Weagle 1993 
Sara O'Connor 1994 
Robert Como 1996 
Joseph Brady (State) 1996 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 



SI FINANCE DIRECTOR Ml 

Donna M. Walsh 
Ml ASSESSOR Ml 

Frank J. Ragonese 
Ml CODE ENFORCER/ BUILDING INSP. Ml 

Allan B. Fraser 
M CEMETERY /PARKS SUPERINTENDENT M 

James Graffum 
M ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 7 

Harry W. Leno 
M TOWN ENGINEER Ml 

James E. Chase 
M FIRE CHIEF, ACTING SI 

Willard I. Maker 
M HARBORMASTER S 

Charles Surpitski 

David Brouillette, Deputy Ml 
Ml HEALTH AGENT 

Domenic A. Badalato SI 

Ml LIBRARIAN 

Eleanor M. Gaunt Ml 

Ml TOWN PLANNER 

Elizabeth M. Ware Ml 



POLICE CHIEF 

Charles D. Surpitski 
PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 

Armand T. Michaud 
RECREATION DIRECTOR 

Elizabeth Dorman 
SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Philip A. Kent 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Richard F. Thompson 
TOWN CLERK 

Frances A. Richards 
TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 

Virginia M. Cleary 
TOWN MANAGER 

George E. Howe 
TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles C. Dalton 
UTILITIES DEPT. DIRECTOR 

Donald R. Stone, Sr. 
DEPUTY TAX COLLECTOR 

Richard E.Sullivan 
PARKING CLERK 

William E. Handren, Jr. 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M 



CEMETERY & PARKS COMMISSION 



M 



M6 



Theodore Lemieux 
Nicholas Markos 
Arthur N. Sot is 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

David Clements, Dir. 

John Clogston, Asst. 



1992 
1993 
1994 



1992 
1992 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Winfred Hardy, Ch. 1992 

Jeanne Parker 1992 

Hubert Tougas 1992 

Helen Drenth 1992 

Deborah Bouranis 1992 

Helen Kalafatas 1992 

Anthony Christopher 1992 

Rita Poirier 1992 



COASTAL POLLUTION CONTROL COMMITTEE 



Robert Cram 1992 

Douglas Bender 1992 

Robert Breaker 1992 

Wayne Castonguay 1992 

Donald Cheney 1992 

Carl Hiltunen 1992 

Aldyth Innis 1992 

Christopher Murray 1992 

Peter Pinciaro 1992 

Robert Porter 1992 

David Rimmer 1992 

Michael Schaaf 1992 

Larry Smith 1992 

Baird Thomas 1992 

Kenneth Blades 1992 

Ronald Cameron 1992 

William Wasserman 1992 

COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 

William Varrell, Ch. 1992 

Dorcas Rice 1992 

Vivian Endicott 1992 

Joseph Carlin 1992 

Andrew Re id 1992 

Anne Teele 1992 

William Faissler 1992 

James Ford 1992 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Lillian North, Ch. 1993 

Richard Nylen, Jr. 1992 

Brandon Boyd 1992 

Joseph Pecoraro 1993 

Wayne Castonguay 1993 

Nicholas Vontzalides 1994 

Beverly Perna 1994 

CABLE TELEVISION 

George Howe 1992 

Raymond Morley 1992 



S FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 
George Howe, Dir. 1992 
Tone Kenney 1992 

Sara O'Connor 1992 

S GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Kathleen Mersereau 1992 
Peter Dziadose 1992 
Carolyn Britt 1992 
John Plate 1992 

Phillip Grenier 1992 

03 HALL-HASKELL STANDING COM. 



M 



Theresa Stephens 


1992 


Stephanie Gaskins 


1992 


Vivian Endicott 


1992 


Helen Burr 


1992 


Joanna McMahon 


1992 


William Thoen 


1992 


Norman Quint 


1992 


Marion Frost 


1992 


Joyce Harrington 


1992 


BOARD OF HEALTH 




Dr. Kenneth Zinn 


1994 


Susan Hubbard 


1992 


Carl Hiltunen 


1993 


HISTORIC STUDY C0M1 


4ITTEE 


Paul McGinley 


1992 


Susan Boice 


1992 


Anne Brown 


1992 


Prudence Fish 


1992 


Dana Jordan 


1992 


Ken Savoie 


1992 


Valda Schreiber 


1992 



M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Frank Ragonese 1993 

John Heaphy 1992 

John Moberger 1994 



-3- 



BAY CIRCUIT PROGRAM 
Lawrence Eliot 



1992 



M 



M6 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING 
Thomas Mayo 1994 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Donald Curiale 1993 

Marjorie Robie 1993 

Arthur Dioli, Jr. 1993 

Susan Nelson 1993 

Mary Conley 1994 

Richard MacKinnon 1994 

Coco McCabe 1994 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Catherine Cecil 1995 

Arthur Weagle 1993 

Sara O'Connor 1994 

Robert Como 199 6 

Joseph Brady (State) 1996 

INDUSTRIAL DEV. FINANC 

James Lahar 1992 

Susan Hubbard 1993 

Loretta Dietch 1995 

George Howe 1996 

IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 

G. Jill Traverso 1992 

Jon Aaron 1992 

Mary Weatherall 1993 

Mary Pollak 1993 

Bror Hultgren 1993 

Judith Imm 1993 

Kristin Ledson 1992 

Michele McGrath 1992 

Jane Harold 1992 

Chip Dort 1992 

Ann Marsh 1992 



O MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 

Leslie Brooks 1992 

Patrick McNally 1992 

Charles Wayne 1992 

Susan Monahan 1992 

Andrew Agapow 1992 

Barbara Ostberg 1992 
James Theodosopoulosl992 

Donald Turbide 1992 

David Moynihan 1992 

Thomas Clements 1992 

Timothy Mauser 1992 

Leonard Heurlin 1992 

M PLANNING BOARD 

Catherine Savoie 1994 

Wayne King 1996 

Thomas Mayo 1992 

Leslie Brooks 1993 

John Beagan 1995 

K.Scott Richards 1993 

S PLUM ISLAND ADVISORY COM 

Beverly Perna 1992 

Nathanial Clapp 1992 

Andrew Gianakakis 1992 

M RECREATION COMMITTEE 

James Foley 1993 

Linda Murphy 1992, 

Nancy Lindquist 1992 

Marcia Ford 1993 

Jim Prato 1993 

Bruce Bryant 1994 

Lawrence Drown 1994 

S REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Peter Ross 1992 

Edmund Traverso 1993 

Mary Maloney 1994 

Joanne Banville 1992 



Ml LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Donald Greenough 
Virginia Jackson 
Rainer Broekel 
George Gray 
Louise Sweetser 
Bette Siegel 
Crocker Snow, Sr. 
Hubert Johnson 
Lawrence Pszenny 



E Elected 

1993 S Appointed by Selectmen 

1994 M Appointed by Town Mgr. 
1994 Other 

1994 1 Supv. by Town Mgr. 

1992 2 Elected at Town Mtg. 

1992 3 Appointed by Moderator 

1992 4 General Laws 

1993 5 1967 STM, Art. II 
1993 6 Confirmed by Selectmen 

7 Confirmed by School Com. 

8 Appointed by Cons. Com. 



-4- 



1991 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 

notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town 

affairs,' to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on MONDAY, THE 

FIRST DAY OF APRIL, 1991, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to 

act on the following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the meeting to order at 7:48 p.m. with 247 
voters present. The final count was 351 at 9:00 p.m. Following the Pledge 
of Allegiance to the Flag, it was moved, seconded and so voted to admit non- 
voters. Chairman of the School Committee Jeffrey Simon introduced and 
welcomed a special group of young people, "Friends Forever", visiting here 
from Ireland. Tellers appointed by the Moderator were Bruce Bryant, Rainer 
Broekel , Robert Brown and Sara O'Connor. 

ARTICLE 1 

To fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the salaries and compensation of all elected 
Town officers be approved as presented in the budget. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried unani- 
mously. 

ARTICLE 2 

To choose the following officers, viz: Constable for one (1) year; Moderator 
for one (1) year; one (1) Selectman for three (3) years; one (1) member of 
the Housing Authority for five (5) years; and two (2) members of the School 
Committee for three (3) years. 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling 
places as follows: Precinct 1--Agawam Village Recreation Hall, County Road; 
Precinct 2--Winthrop School, Central Street; Precinct 3--Ipswich High School, 
High Street; Precinct 4--Whittier Manor Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue; on 
Monday, April 8, 1991. The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 
8:00 p.m.; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to accept Article 2 as pre- 
sented in the Warrant for the April 1, 1991, Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 3 

To choose one (1) member of the Finance Committee for three (3) years. 

Moderator James Grimes announced that several citizens would be nominated to 
the Finance Committee for three (3) years. A hand count would be taken for 
each nominee with a runoff between the top two. 

There were four nominations: Richard Howard nominated by Richard "Chip" 
Nylen, Boyd Finch nominated by former Finance Committee member William 
Markos, Eugene Hail son nominated by Ursula Clements, and Raymond Morley nomi- 
nated by Bruce Cutler. All nominations were seconded. Finance Committee 

-5- 



recommended Boyd Finch, School Committee recommended Eugene Hail son and 
Richard Howard, Board of Selectmen made no recommendations. A motion to 
close the nominations carried on a unanimous voice vote. In the first vote, 
Boyd Finch finished on top with 152 to 125 for Richard Howard, 39 for Eugene 
Hail son, and 11 for Raymond Morley. In a runoff between Boyd Finch and 
Richard Howard, Boyd Finch won with 180 to Howard's 100. Finance Committee 
member George Jewell was given a vote of thanks for his years of service to 
the Town. 

ARTICLE 4 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative to the 
municipal budget and (1) to raise, appropriate, and transfer money for the 
ensuing year's operations, including the compensation of elected Town 
Officers; and (2) to change the purpose for the unexpended balance of the 
appropriation authorized under Article 14 of the April 3, 1989, Annual Town 

Meeting from " Construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under 

Chapter 90..." to "FY1992 Municipal Operating Budget - transfer of available 
funds"; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee Chairman William Craft moved that the Town vote (1) to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $7,117,711 for the purposes indicated in the FY92 
Operating Budget as outlined in the Finance Committee Report, pp. 16-22; (2) 
further move that: 

For the Operating Budget of $7,117,711, the Town: 
Transfer from Available Funds: 

Special Assessments (Sewer, Water, Street Betterments) $31,600 

Overlay Reserve 119,936 
Cemetery Perpetual Care and Flower Fund Interest: 

Offset Cemeteries and Parks Division Budget 26,000 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund Principal: 

Offset Cemeteries & Parks Div. Budget Capital Outlay 2,000 

Water Division Surplus 20,000 

Storm drainage (Article 19, 4/4/88 Annual Town Meeting) 7,462 

Storm drainage (Article 10, 9/28/87 Special Town Meeting) 15,262 

High Street land (Article 9, 6/20/88 Special Town Meeting) 132 

Clamshell Road (Article 4, 6/20/88 Special Town Meeting) 24,154 
Library Air Conditioning (Article 18, 4/3/89 Annual Town 

Meeting) 29,989 

Chapter 90 contract reimbursement 87,601 

Chapter 90 (Article 15, 4/4/88 Annual Town Meeting) 7,118 

Chapter 90 (Article 14, 4/6/87 Annual Town Meeting) 3,802 
Wetlands Protection Fund - Offset Conservation Commission 

Budget 1,200 
Avery Street land/easements (Article 39, 4/3/89 Annual 

Town Meeting) 1,375 
Water Treatment Plant (Article 38, 4/2/84 Annual Town 

Meeting) 4,463 

Insurance Less than $10,000 Fund 6,454 

Municipal Buildings Insurance Fund 4,837 

Total $393,385 

Net to be raised and assessed: $6,724,326 



-6- 



and (3) further move that the Town transfer the remaining balance of 
monies raised and appropriated under Article 10 of the April 2, 1990, 
Annual Town Meeting from construction and repair of roads and bridges 
under Chapter 90 to offset the FY1992 Municipal Operating Budget in the 
amount of $107,025. 

Adjusted Net to be Raised and Assessed $6,617,301 

Seconded. Mr. Craft carefully explained the budget in the Finance Committee Report 
how the budget process works. The Finance Committee unanimously recommended this 
budget. 

Mr. Engel made a detailed presentation on the million dollar deficit in the 
Town's revenue and explained what steps have been taken to solve the problem 
including reorganization and annual audits. Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended this budget. 

Questions on the capital fund, capital expenditures, cash surplus transfers, 
consulting fees and recreation expenses by William Wasserman, Joni Soffron, 
and David Warner were answered by Mr. Engel, Mr. Craft, and Betty Dorman. 
Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 5 

To hear and act upon the reports of the Finance Committee and of the School 
Committee relative to the School Department budget and to raise, appropriate, 
and transfer money for the enduing year's operations; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

School Committee Chairman Jeffrey Simon moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $8,780,000 for the School Department Budget for FY92. 
Seconded. Finance Committee, Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. 
Mr. Simon gave a brief history of the schools dating back to 1642. He went 
on to explain in detail about the large cuts in the school budget this year 
and for fiscal 1992 noting increases in benefits, services and programs. Mr. 
Simon said that despite an eight percent increase in enrollment and dwindling 
state aid, the schools have implemented a new math program, a wider variety 
of language and technical courses, foreign languages by satellite and a 
branch of the Cooperative Bank at the High School. The School Committee 
urged support for the school budget. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover 
the Town's share of the ensuing year's annual operating and debt service 
expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Whittier School Committeeman Eugene Hail son moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $126,660 to cover the Town's share of the ensuing 
year's annual operating and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District. Seconded. Mr. Hail son 
spoke on the success of the Whittier Program with 82% placement of its gra- 
duating class. Finance Committee member Allen Swan noted there were thirty 
day students and twenty-five tuition paying adult students at Whittier. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, and School Committee unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried unanimously. 

-7- 



PROPOSED MUNICIPAL OPERATING BUDGET FOR TOWN MEETING ACTION 



FY89 

EXPENDED 



FY90 

EXPENDED 



FY91 * 
APPRO. 



FY92 

RECOMMENDED 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: ADMINISTRATION & LEGAL 



003 SELECTMEN: 





Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Labor Consultants 

Capital Outlay 

Total 


$17,330 

2,611 





19,941 


$18,346 

2,636 





20,982 


$17,193 

2,555 

400 



20,148 


$17,193 

5,900 

400 



23,493 


005 


TOWN MANAGER: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Labor Consultants 

Capital Outlay 

Total 


96,350 

19,497 

3,894 

13,578 

133,319 


102,330 

20,738 

660 



123,728 


106,206 

22,780 

5,712 



134,698 


81,840 

14,193 

5,000 



101,033 


009 


MODERATOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 


100 



100 


100 



100 


100 

10 

110 


100 

10 

110 


011 


FINANCE COMMITTEE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 



2,963 
2,963 



2,960 
2,960 



3,225 
3,225 


2,000 
3,525 
5,525 


015 


ELECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Total 


13,355 

2,704 



16,059 


10,824 

6,768 



17,592 


16,030 

6,300 



22,330 


11,264 

6,950 



18,214 


039 


TOWN CLERK: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Capital Outlay 
Total 


42,030 

2,717 



775 

45,522 


46,558 

2,710 



159 

49,427 


37,147 

3,182 

300 



40,629 


43,716 

3,677 

300 



47,693 


045 


LEGAL: 

Salaries & Wages 

Town Counsel-Litigation 

Special Counsel 

Expenses 

Total 


12,000 

29,378 



2,412 

43,790 


12,960 
28,000 
13,122 
2,171 
56,253 


12,960 
28,000 
10,000 
2,580 
53,540 


12,960 
28,000 
10,000 
2,580 
53,540 




TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 
ADMINISTRATION & LEGAL 


261,694 


271,042 


274,680 


249,608 



-8- 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



FY89 

EXPENDED 



FY90 
EXPENDED 



FY91 * 
APPRO. 



FY92 

RECOMMENDED 



025 ACCOUNTANT: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

029 ASSESSORS: 

Salaries & Wages 
Valuation Fee 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

033 TREASURER/ COLLECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

035 PURCHASING & BUDGET 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



94,940 

22,386 



117,326 



89,390 

1,640 

10,031 

488 

101,549 



87,393 

12,760 



4,426 

104,579 



TOTAL FINANCE DEPARTMENT 323,454 

PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 



88,106 

23,189 



111,295 



95,131 

5,200 

9,615 

500 

110,446 



94,116 

12,405 



1,591 

108,112 








329,853 



86,458 

27,583 

4,090 

118,131 



100,246 

3,500 

11,128 



114,874 



92,427 

12,567 

2,800 

320 

108,114 








341,119 



87,546 

23,585 



111,131 



101,196 

3,500 

11,360 



116,056 



104,432 

15,319 

2,800 



122,551 



24,770 
6,595 
4,500 

35,865 

385,603 



061 APPEALS BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

063 PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Planning Consultants 

Reimbursable 

General 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



1,650 

235 



1,885 


935 

345 



1,280 


3,000 

701 



3,701 


3,000 

1,302 



4,302 


3,390 
2,681 


46,958 
2,854 


52,577 
3,450 


50,077 
5,950 



7,350 
1,827 
5,248 




52,000 



101,812 




30,000 

500 

86,527 



20,000 


76,027 



■9- 



064 MASTER PLAN COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Planning Consultants: 
Total 

481 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total , 

487 CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PLANNING & COMMUNITY 
DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 



FY8 9 


PY90 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


695 


730 


539 


136 


3,112 


6,000 


4,346 


6,866 


60 


50 


755 


8,200 








815 


8,250 


1,600 





527 


2,560 


843 


1,481 


2,970 


4,041 


65,264 


122,249 



FY91 * FY92 
APPRO. RECOMMENDED 



1,000 

700 



1,700 



1,000 

1,400 



2,400 



1,800 
1,275 
1,000 
4,075 



98,403 



1,000 

700 



1,700 



1,000 

1,400 



2,400 



1,800 
1,375 
1,000 
4,175 



88,604 



PUBLIC SAFETY DEPARTMENT 



101 POLICE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 

Drug Enforcement Fund 
Ambulance Contract 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

102 HARBORS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

103 FIRE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Training 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



780,179 


858,375 


950,052 


969,843 


35,753 


29,571 


37,253 


43,154 


28,290 


28,076 


29,722 


38,205 





1,000 


1,000 


500 


110,000 


125,000 


125,000 


125,000 


42,919 


148,741 


31,356 


32,146 


997,141 


1,190,763 


1,174,383 


1,208,848 








3,664 


6,930 


5,030 


4,529 


4,606 


4,805 


316 


563 


875 


1,050 


1,614 


8,372 


4,483 





6,960 


13,464 


13,628 


12,785 


571,201 


644,822 


689,309 


706,315 


3,297 


1,854 


4,175 


3,200 


59,190 


55,029 


50,160 


39,762 


4,247 


6,013 


5,470 


13,688 


47,674 


208,758 


11,000 


3,425 


685,609 


916,476 


760,114 


766,390 



■10- 



112 SHELLFISH: 

Salaries & Wages 
Consultants 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

131 CIVIL DEFENSE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

133 ANIMAL CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY DEP'T, 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



FY89 
EXPENDED 


FY90 
EXPENDED 


FY91 * 
APPRO. 


FY92 

RECOMMENDED 


28,560 

900 

2,462 

451 




30,322 

900 

2,312 

1,006 




36,042 



4,225 

700 




31,442 



2,625 

1,650 





32,373 



34,540 



40,967 



35,717 



3,000 


3,000 


3,000 


3,000 


1,997 


2,075 


1,950 


2,075 











75 














4,997 


5,075 


4,950 


5,150 


19,345 


21,000 


23,724 


23,724 


4,110 


4,569 


4,120 


4,032 


252 


434 


1,762 


1,865 


8,487 





200 





32,194 


26,003 


29,806 


29,621 


1,759,274 


2,186,321 


2,023,848 


2,058,511 



065 TOWN HALL & ANNEX: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

109 FORESTRY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

301 ADMINISTRATION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



19,523 


20,952 


23,294 


21,945 


15,843 


17,807 


10,576 


10,576 


6,386 


7,351 


14,520 


17,817 


6,733 


1,762 


8,925 


544 


48,485 


47,872 


57,315 


50,882 


77,148 


73,698 








23,011 


21,461 








2,298 


2,727 








946 


14,181 








03,403 


112,067 








54,925 


58,356 


62,910 


63,385 


2,054 


2,298 


2,556 


2,467 














56,979 


60,654 


65,466 


65,852 



-11- 



3 03 HIGHWAY: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Road Treatment 

Capital Outlay 

Total 

3 05 SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Rental 
Total 

3 09 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Consultants 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

403 SANITATION CONTRACT: 

Sanitation Composite Contract 
Spring & Fall Cleaning 
Sanitation Revolving Fund 
Total 



571 CEMETERIES, PARKS & BUILDING MAINTENANCE 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS DEP'T. 



FY89 


FY9 


FY91 * 


FY92 


EXPENDED 


EXPENDED 


APPRO. 


RECOMMENDED 


162,926 


183,079 


202,849 


211,097 


139,207 


140,981 


186,892 


184,780 


242,739 


196,650 


225,000 


176,900 


111,525 


171,358 


22,300 


4,000 


656,397 


692,068 


637,041 


576,777 


18,696 


44,491 


25,000 


25,000 


53,371 


84,937 


67,550 


67,550 


2,248 


7,217 


5,600 


5,600 


6,745 


24,877 


27,000 


27,000 


81,060 


161,522 


125,150 


125,150 


26,810 


28,163 


30,606 


31,328 














28,280 


38,875 


39,071 


35,840 


9,538 


9,546 


10,456 


15,840 


13 ,.448 











78,076 


76,584 


80,133 


83,008 


371,000 


402,000 


708,743 


599,694 


65,688 


48,000 


59,700 











50,000 


36,510 


436,688 


450,000 


818,443 


636,204 


INTENANCE: 
169,646 


162,498 


197,228 


239,111 


21,629 


24,871 


22,246 


27,546 


5,755 


7,860 


8,075 


14,711 


14,588 


12,420 


21,000 


5,375 


211,618 


207,649 


248,549 


286,743 


1,672,706 


1,808,416 


2,032,097 


1,824,616 



UTILITIES DEPARTMENT 



409 SEWER: 

Salaries & Wages 

Benefits 

Consultants 

Expenses 

Insurance 

Energy Supplies 

Interst & Debt Payment 

Capital Outlay 

Total 

TOTAL UTILITIES DEPARTMENT 



175,517 


194,190 


178,076 


183,084 








28,922 


34,015 








40,750 


5,950 


188,227 


201,821 


114,264 


139,949 








10,455 


9,257 


8,238 


8,427 


82,037 


106,479 








5,829 





13,353 








4,900 


385,335 


404,438 


460,333 


483,634 


385,335 


404,438 


460,333 


483,634 



-12- 



FY89 

EXPENDED 



FY90 
EXPENDED 



PY91 * 
APPRO. 



FY92 

RECOMMENDED 



INSPECTIONAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

113 BUILDING INSPECTION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Inspection Consultant 
Energy Supplies 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

501 HEALTH: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Energy Supplies 
Emergency Fund 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

502 HEALTH CONTRACTS: 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Total 

TOTAL INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 

HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

531 COUNCIL ON AGING: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

551 VETERANS' BENEFITS: 
Expenses 
Total 

601 LIBRARY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



42,427 


45,639 


48,147 


48,499 





2,350 


5,000 


3,000 


149 


444 


360 


722 


3,488 


3,305 


3,725 


3,860 


12,309 


540 








58,373 


52,278 


57,232 


56,081 


69,186 


72,907 


78,213 


51,498 


193,396 


187,973 


189,385 


6,610 











6,042 




















1,000 


1,000 


807 











263,389 


260,880 


268,598 


65,150 











173,425 











2,700 











176,125 


321,762 


313,158 


325,830 


297,356 



8,743 


9,830 


10,000 


11,928 


20,002 


21,436 


22,338 


21,505 


28,745 


31,266 


32,338 


33,433 


85,017 


147,106 


125,000 


125,000 


85,017 


147,106 


125,000 


125,000 


157,297 


176,872 


184,018 


166,432 


66,034 


71,471 


68,465 


65,731 


1,268 


1,296 


4,700 


4,620 


2,234 


450 


400 





226,833 


250,089 


257,583 


236,783 



-13- 



FY89 

EXPENDED 


FY90 
EXPENDED 


FY91 * 
APPRO. 


FY92 
RECOMMENDED 


53,458 

18,312 

471 

5,000 



77,241 


56,446 
18,605 
419 

22,489 
97,959 


63,108 

20,696 

555 





84,359 


63,479 

19,917 

950 





84,346 


417,836 


526,420 


499,280 


479,562 


174,492 


195,734 


235,579 


276,949 


11,775 
339,337 
340,040 

13,862 
705,014 


17,015 
400,191 
134,665 

16,506 
568,377 


17,528 
417,746 
171,448 

22,618 
629,340 


18,054 
479,083 
188,852 

44,335 
730,324 


24,500 
1,076 
4,111 

29,687 


200,000 

3,151 

10,235 

213,386 






12,000 

12,000 






12,600 

12,600 



621 RECREATION AND YOUTH SERVICES: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Youth Services 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES DEP'T. 

UNCLASSIFIED 

081 INSURANCE: 

071 BENEFITS: 

Military Service Credits 
County Retirement System 
Health & Life 
Medicare 
Total 

701 DEBT SERVICE: 

Payment of Principal 
Payment of Interest 
Interest on Tax Ant. Notes 
Total 

091 OFFICE EQUIPMENT: 7,303 56,336 9,568 9,500 

013 RESERVE FUND: (Transfers into appropriate budgets in prior years; 
funded @ $45,000 in all years) 

091 AUDIT FEE: 

091 SALARY TRANSFER ACCOUNT: ** 

091 POSTAGE: 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 955,349 1,090,902 975,576 1,250,217 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET: $6,162,674 $7,052,799 $7,031,166 $7,117,711 

* Note: FY '91 reflects Reserve Fund transfers through February 12, 1991. 
** Represents allowance for salary/wage increases which in prior years 
have been incorporated in individual department budgets. 









34,339 


45,000 


22,603 


42,250 


31,750 


38,338 











112,706 


16,250 


14,819 


23,000 


24,800 



•14- 



ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
ensuing year's expenses of the Water Division, said sum to be offset by revenues 
of the Water Division during FY92, and to transfer a sum of money from the 
surplus account to Water capital outlay and/or debt service; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,080,284 for the ensuing year's expenses of the Water Division, said 
sum to be offset by revenues of the Water Division during FY92. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Mr. Engel 
explained the appropriation to be offset by revenues and what the Water 
Department had accomplished on the meter replacement program. Finance 
Committee Member Leonard Heurlin endorsed the article and praised Mr. Engel 
on his work with the Water Filtration Plant. 

Antonia Poltack questioned the legality of eliminating a position in the Water 
Department and transferring the salary money into the Treasurer's budget. 
Mr. Engel, who was confused by the question, said the Water Department was 
recently placed under the new Department of Utilities, and that a position 
had been cut in the reorganization of the Water Department. 

David Warner asked of the water rates would go up and Mr. Engel answered, 
"No." Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay unpaid bills 
incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; and (2) to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money and/or to appropriate a sum of money from the 
Water Division surplus account to pay any Water Division unpaid bills 
incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of 
$5,863.53 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 

School Department - Expenses 

Electric Department $ 476.70 

Water and Sewer Departments 63.84 

American Educational Music Publications 89.00 

Sewer Department - Expenses 

Water Department 2,687.52 

Cemetery and Parks Department - Expenses 

Water Department 509.68 

Fire Department - Expenses 

Essex Office, Inc. 68.55 

Edwin R. Emerson - Medical bill reimbursement 87.00 

Veterans' Services - Expenses 

Caldwell Nursing Home 1,881.24 

Total $5,863.53 ; and 

(2) to raise this appropriation, the sum of $5,863.53 shall be transferred from 
overlay reserve. 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously approved. Motion 
carried unanimously. 

-15- 



ARTICLE 9 

\o see it the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, or to transfer from 
available funds, sums of money to fund supplements to the Town and School 
Operating Budgets for FY91 and the Water Division Operating Budget for FY91; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town appropriate $36,000, and 
transfer $36,000 from overlay reserve, to fund supplements to the FY91 
Miscellaneous Finance Departmental Budget: 

$26,000 Health Insurance 
10,000 Accounting and/or Auditing Services 

$36,000 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion 
carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote subject to the provisions of the Town's Charter 
(1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money to engage engineering services 
and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for the construction and 
maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the General Laws, as 
amended; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and 
expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the afore- 
mentioned purposes; and (3) to determine if said appropriation shall be con- 
tingent upon the passage of an override referendum under the provisions of 
MGL, Chapter 59, Section 21C (i£), or otherwise; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town vote subject to the provisions of 
the Town's Charter (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $116,801 to engage 
engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for 
the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, as amended; and (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply 
for, accept, and expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be available 
for the aforementioned purposes; said appropriation to be contingent upon the 
passage of an override referendum under the provisions of MGL, Chapter 59, 
Section 21C (U). 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Finance Committee Member Jamie Fay explained this would be a one time debt 
exclusion for this purpose only and would appear on the tax bills for one year 
and disappear after the money is spent. Daniel Cashman questioned why we 
needed to raise money when we. already had $10.7,000 in the road repair account. 
($107,025 balance which was appropriated in 1990 was transferred to the FY1992 
Municipal Operating Budget) Moderator James Grimes explained this was for a 
prior fiscal year, and this one time capital outlay expenditure exclusion was 
needed to seek matching funds for the current fiscal year. Motion carried on 
a majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to authorize the Treasurer, with the appro- 
val of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time, in antici- 
pation of the revenue for the financial year beginning July 01, 1991, and 
ending June 30, 1992, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions 



-16- 



of the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended; (2) to authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to enter into a writ- 
ten agreement with a banking institution for the provision of banking ser- 
vices to the Town, in accordance with the provisions of Section 53F of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws, as amended; and (3) to rescind its authoriza- 
tion to borrow the unissued balances of monies authorized under Article 7 of 
the June 20, 1988, Special Town Meeting; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectman William Walton moved that the Town vote to accept Article 11 as pre- 
sented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee una- 
nimously in favor. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see what action the Town will take with regard to the transfer of any 

surplus funds in the Electric Light Department. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $575,000 
from the surplus account in the Electric Light Division for the purpose of 
reducing taxes. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously 
recommended. Mr. Engel explained this transfer of funds in two parts: (1) 
$200,000 as the Electric Light Department's annual contribution to the Town in 
lieu of taxes and (2) $375,000 as a one time transfer. Finance Committee 
Member Lawrence Pszenny said the reason why we can fund our deficit problem 
with Electric Light Department surplus funds is because we have an efficient, 
effective municipal light department with the lowest rates in the state. 
Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money to 
survey, design, and construct alterations to the Middle School to improve 
handicapped accessibility, including but not limited to an elevator, 
wheelchair ramp, and modifications to toilet facilities, and to obtain all 
services and/or materiel incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any Federal and/or State grants 
which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; and (3) to determine 
if said appropriation shall be contingent upon the passage of an override 
referendum under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 21C 
(ii), or otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Chairman of the School Building Needs Committee Ken Savoie moved that the 
Town vote (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $150,000 to survey, design, 
and construct alterations to the Middle School to improve handicapped accessi- 
bility, including but not limited to an elevator, wheelchair ramp, and modifi- 
cations to toilet facilities, and to obtain all services and/or materiel 
incidental thereto; and (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, 
accept, and expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be available for 
the aforementioned purposes; said appropriation to be contingent upon the 
passage of an override referendum under the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 59, Section 21C (U). 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, and School Building Needs 
Committee unanimously recommended. 



-17- 



Mr. Savoie outlined the issues and reasons to support this article on the 
ballot. He listed three advantages: to improve education, save money, and 
avoid a lawsuit. Finance Committee Member Alice Shurcliff, who is also a 
member of the School Building Needs Committee urged everyone's support to 
bring the Middle School up to date. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 57C of 
Chapter 59 of the Massachusetts General Laws regarding quarterly tax bills; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to accept Article 14 as pre- 
sented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended, 
Finance Committee voted 8 to 1 not to recommend. Mr. Engel said it would 
improve the Town's cash flow by bringing in more money. There would be less 
frequent "dry periods" which would force the Town to borrow money in anticipa- 
tion of taxes. Therefore, the Town and the taxpayers save money by avoiding 
that borrowing. 

Finance Committee Member Allen Swan referred to the quarterly tax bills as a 
"hidden tax". Taxpayers would be paying off their tax bill more often, 
instead of saving the money and possibly earning interest. Swan's statements 
were supported by Joseph Petranek and Taylor Amerding, who warned that soon 
the Town will be taxing us e\/ery week. Joseph Rogers questioned the minority 
vote on the Finance Committee. Minority member Leonard Heurlin said he 
checked with other Towns and they all saved money very satisfactorily. 
Motion failed on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 15 

To hear and act on the reports of the Committees and to continue such 

Committees as the Town may vote to continue. 

Dorcas Rice read the report and her comments for the Commuter Rail Committee. 
She asked that it be accepted and the committee continued. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

Ken Savoie moved the Historic District Study Committee be continued. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Ken Savoie gave a report with a slide presentation for the school Building 
Needs Committee and moved that it be accepted and the committee continued. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Terri Stephens asked that the report of the Hall -Haskell House Committee be 
accepted, and the committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Pat McNally moved that the Master Plan Commission be continued. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

Angel o Perna gave a report with a slide presentation on the work being done 
to clean up and paint the inside of the Memorial Building by a group of 
volunteers. No vote was taken because there is no committee yet. 

Sara O'Connor raised a Point of Order and questioned the quorum. Moderator 
James Grimes thanked everyone who did stay for the meeting. For the vote on 
the Point of Order, Mr. Grimes asked everyone there to raise their hands. At 
10:52 p.m., a motion was made to adjourn the meeting until Tuesday, April 2, 
1991, at 7:30 p.m. Seconded, voted. 

-18- 



April 2, 1991 

At /:3U p.m. there were 89 voters present. It was moved, seconded and voted 
to adjourn until 8:00 p.m. At 8:00 p.m. there were 146 voters present. 
Moderator James Grimes continually asked voters to wait a little longer. At 
8:30 p.m., Mr. Grimes announced "we need 16" having reached a total of 184. 
Phone calls were made to friends and neighbors and two requests for 
registered voters on the Police and Fire scanners. At 9:05 p.m., 197 voters 
had checked in - three short of a quorum. By that time, however, several had 
apparently left and it appeared a challenge of the quorum would be success- 
ful. At 9:15 p.m. with three short of the quorum, a motion was made to 
adjourn the meeting until Monday, April 22nd at 7:30 p.m. Seconded, voted. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote to accept legal ownership of a certain parcel of 
land for the purposes set forth in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 45, 
#14, shown as Lot 1 on "Plan of Land in Ipswich, Massachusetts, prepared for 
Cable Development Associates, scale 1" = 40', dated May 22, 1989, prepared by 
Hancock Survey Associates," recorded with the Essex South District Registry 
of Deeds at Plan Book 257, Plan 67; and containing an area of 2.97 + acres, 
under the care, custody, management, and control of the Town's Board of 
Cemetery and Park Commissioners; said conveyance to be subject to the ease- 
ments, restrictions and other encumbrances set forth in Exhibit A annexed to 
the deed, recorded at Essex South District Registry of Deeds, Book 10233, 
Page 139; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town vote to accept Article 16 as pre- 
sented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Arthur Sorenson spoke against acceptance of Sledding 
Hill at Cable Gardens. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote to dedicate and name as the "Guy Hicken Memorial 
Reservation" certain parcels of land owned by the Town in the area of High 
Street (Essex South Registry of Deeds Book 9924, Page 157, and Book 10440, 
Page 325); or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to accept Article 17 as pre- 
sented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee una- 
nimously recommended. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "General By-Laws of the Town of 
Ipswich", CHAPTER XII. USE OF STREETS, SIDEWALKS, AND PUBLIC PLACES," by 
adding a new section 10 thereto: 

" Section 10. Scenic Roads 

No person shall alter, remove, or relocate or destroy any tree(s) and/or 
stone wall(s) within any scenic road unless and until said person shall 
have obtained a written permit from the Planning Board; and all said 
alteration(s), removal (s), rel ocation(s ) , or destruction (s ) shall comply 
with the provisions of said permit in all material respects." ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 



-19- 



Selectman William George moved that the Town vote to accept Article 18 as pre- 
sented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and 
Planning Board unanimously support and recommend this article. Planning Board 
Chairman Ken Savoie outlined the procedure to get a written permit allowing 
any changes within any of the Town's twenty scenic roads. Motion carried una- 
nimously. 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "General By-Laws of the Town of 
Ipswich, "CHAPTER XV. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY, 
Section 14. Street Numbers Posted for All Buildings " , by deleting sub- 
section (b)(2) in its entirety and by substituting in lieu thereof the 
fol lowi ng: 

"(2) In order to be visible from the road, street, or way, the number 

shall be of a contrasting color and shall be reasonably visible to 
persons or vehicles approaching from either direction upon said 
road, street, or way." ; and 

by inserting new subsections (c) and (d) as follows: 

"(c) Each new building shall be identified in accordance with 

this Section before a Certificate of Use and Occupancy is issued 
therefor. 

(d) Penalty: The penalty for any violation of Section 14 shall be 
fifty ($50.00) dollars. Upon notice of violation, an owner or 
occupant shall correct such violation within thirty (30) days. 
Each thirty (30) day period of non-compliance shall be deemed a 
separate offense. "; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Acting Fire Chief Will ard Maker moved that the Town vote to accept Article 19 
as presented in the warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Mr. Maker spoke in favor of the amendments to the 
street numbering bylaw which was adopted in 1989. He suggested proper numbers 
for better response. The Fire Department in in the process of contacting 
residents who are in violation of the bylaw. Homeowners will be required to 
post their street numbers on their homes or be subject to a fine. 

Richard Murray spoke against the amendments to the street numbering bylaw. He 
said we are making laws we don't need. Motion passes by majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of the following 

Massachusetts General Laws with the following titles: 

(a) Chapter 148, Section 26G. "Automatic Sprinkler Systems. Required 
Installation; Exceptions; Alternative Fire Suppressant Systems." ; 

(b) Chapter 148, Section 26H. "Automatic Sprinkler Systems; Lodging or 
Boarding Houses; Exceptions; Definitions." ; and 

(c) Chapter 148, Section 261. "Automatic Sprinkler Systems; New or 
Used Multi-Unit Residential Structures." ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

-20- 



Acting Fire Chief Willard Maker moved that action on this article be divided 
into two questions. (1) that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
the following Massachusetts General Laws with the following titles: 

(a) Chapter 148, Section 26G. "Automatic Sprinkler Systems. Required 
Installation; Exceptions; Alternative Fire Suppressant Systems." ; 

(b) Chapter 148, Section 261. "Automatic Sprinkler Systems; New or 
Used Multi-Unit Residential Structures." and 

(2) that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 

General Laws, Chapter 148, Section 26H. "Automatic Sprinkler Systems; 
Lodging or Boarding Houses; Exceptions; Definitions." 

Seconded. Mr. Maker explained the provisions of the two Mass. General Laws 
which require sprinkler systems in all new or used multi-unit residential, 
lodging or boarding houses. Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unani- 
mously recommended. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to adopt the following fee schedule: 

" Miscellaneous Licenses Reference Fee 

Pasteurization License C94:#48A $40.00 

Milk Dealer C94:#41 10.00 

Sale of Soft Drinks C140:#21B 25.00 

Methyl Alcohol C94:#303B 5.00 

Killing of Horses Clll:#154 10.00 

Horse Stables Clll:#155 40.00 

Common Victualler's C140:#2 50.00 

Public Lodging Houses, Motel s C140:#34 50.00 

Miscellaneous Licenses Reference Fee 

Rec. Camp for kids (32B) C140:#32B $ 50.00 

Lunch Carts C140:#49 50.00 
Removal of Underground 

Flammables Storage Tank C148:#38A 200.00 

Raffles C271:#7(a) 25.00/yr. 

Fortune Tellers C140: #1851 (and to accept 

said statute) 50.00" ; 

(2) to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, "CHAPTER XV. 
MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY", by adding a new 
Section 15 thereto: 

"Section 15. Keeping, Storage, Manufacture or Sale of Flammables, Explosives 
Any building or other structure used for the keeping, storage, manufacture 
or sale of any of the articles enumerated in General Laws, Chapter 148, #9, 
shall be subject to the following fees in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 148, #13: 

Activity Reference Fee 

Keeping, Storage, Manufacture, 
Sale of Flammables, Explosives - 

Original License C148:#13 $ 100.00/2 yrs. 

Renewal Certificate C148: #13 25.00/2 yrs." 



-21- 



and (3) to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, "CHAPTER XV. 
MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY", by adding a new 
Section 16 thereto as follows: 

"Section 16. Fees Payable to Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Any person who has a weight or measuring device sealed by the Sealer of 
Weights and Measures shall pay the following fees in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 98, #56: 

Weighing or Measuring Device and Detail Fees 

$ 75.00 

30.00 

15.00 

10.00 

7.00 

1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 



8.00 
4.00 

4.00 
Fee 
$ 4.00 



Balances and Scales: 






Scale w/Cap Over 10,000 


Pounds 


C98:#56 


Scale w/Cap 1,000-5,000 


Pounds 


C98:#56 


Scale w/Cap 100 - 1,000 


Pounds 


C98:#56 


Scale w/Cap 10-100 Pound 


Is 


C98:#56 


Scale w/Cap Under 10 Pounds 


C98:#56 


Weights: 






Avoirdupois (each) 




C98:#56 


Metric 




C98:#56 


Apothecary 




C98:#56 


Troy 




C98:#56 


Capacity Measures: 






Vehicle Tanks: 






Each Indicator 




C98:#56 


Each 100 Gals or fraction thereof C98:#56 


Liquid: 






One Gallon or less 




C98:#56 


Miscellaneous Licenses 




Reference 


More Than One Gallon 




C98:#56 


Liquid Measuring Meters 






Inlet h n or less: 






Oil , Grease 




C98:#56 


Inlet more than §'* to 1": 






Gasol ine 




C98:#56 


Inlet more than 1" : 






Vehicle Tank Pump 




C98:#56 


Vehicle Tank Gravity 




C98:#56 


Bulk Storage 




C98:#56 


Company Supplies Prover 




C98:#56 


Pumps: 






Each stop on pump 




C98:#56 


Other Devices: 






Taxi Meters 




C98:#56 


Odometer - Hubodometer 




C98:#56 


Leather Meas. (Semi -Ann. 


,) 


C98:#56 


Fabric Measuring 




C98:#56 


Wire-Rope-Cordage 




C98:#56 


Lin. Meas. 






Yard Sticks 




C98:#56 


Tapes 




C98:#56 


Misc. 






Mil k Jars (per gross) 




C98:#56 


Dry Measures 




C98:#56 



8.00 

10.00 

30.00 
50.00 
60.00 
50.00 

2.00 

15.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

2.00 
2.00 

15.00 
2.00 



or to take any other action relative thereto. 



-22- 



Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town vote to accept Article 21 as pre- 
sented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee una- 
nimously recommended. Mr. Wayne said this article would bring our fee 
schedule up to date. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 60, Section 
23B of the General Laws, providing for an alternative fee schedule for 
the preparation of lien certificates; or to take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Selectman William George moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Article 22 as presented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen unani- 
mously in favor. Finance Committee unanimously did not recommend. Finance 
Committee member Allen Swan explained what the liens consisted of and 
disagreed with the proposal to adopt a sliding scale for municipal lien cer- 
tificates in place of the $25 flat rate now. Motion fails to pass on a voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 23 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 

General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 21E, which establishes (a) due dates for the 

payment of municipal charges and bills; and (b) determines the interest 

charge for any unpaid balance(s) shall be as set forth in Massachusetts 

General Laws, Chapter 49, Section 57; or to take any other action relative 

thereto. 

Selectman William Walton moved indefinitely postponement. Seconded. Motion 
to postpone indefinitely carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 24 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 
Ipswich, "CHAPTER XV. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY, 
Section 5.(e) Dog Control ", by deleting from the fourth line thereof the 
figure "$5.00" and by substituting in lieu thereof "$10.00"; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectman William Walton moved that the Town vote to accept Article 24 as pre- 
sented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee una- 
nimously in favor. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 25 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 147A, relative to dog control; and (2) to 
amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, "CHAPTER XV. MISCELLANEOUS 
PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY", by adding a new Subsection (f) there- 
to: 

"(f) Dog Fees 

The following fee schedule for dog licenses shall be in effect in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 140:147A: 



-23- 



Dog or Activity 
Dog Licenses: 
Male 
Female 

Spayed/ Neutered 
Kennel 4 dogs or less 
Kennel 10 dogs or less 
Kennel more than 10 dogs 
Substitute Dog Tag 
Late Fee for Licensing Dog 
Boarding of Dogs 

Adoption 



or to take any other action relative thereto 



Fee 



$ 10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
25.00 
50.00 
100.00 
5.00 
10.00 

10.00/day (plus 
10.00 pickup fee) 
10.00 (plus any 
appl icable 
deposit per G.L 
C.140:139A) M ; 



Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town vote (1) to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 147A, relative to dog 
control; and (2) to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich, "CHAPTER 
XV. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY", SECTION 5, DOG 
CONTROL, by adding a new Subsection (f) thereto: 

"(f) Dog Fees 

The following fee schedule for dog licenses shall be in effect in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 140: 147A: 



Dog or Activity 
Dog Licenses: 
Male 
Female 

Spayed/Neutered 
Kennel 4 dogs or less 
Kennel 10 dogs or less 
Kennel more than 10 dogs 
Substitute Dog Tag 
Late Fee for Licensing Dog 
Boarding of Dogs 

Adoption 



Fee 



$ 10.00 
15.00 
10.00 
25.00 
50.00 
100.00 
5.00 
10.00 

10.00/day (plus 
10.00 pickup fee) 
10.00 (plus any 
appl icable 
deposit per 
C.140:139A)" 



G.L 



Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously approved catching up on fee schedu- 
les. Finance Committee member Constance Surpitski read an amendment to the 
new fees. She proposed a fee of $5 for males and spayed females; $10 for 
unspayed females. Finance Committee unanimously in favor of the amendment. 
Board of Selectmen unanimously against the amendment. Amendment fails on a 
voice vote. Motion carried on a voice vote. 



-24- 



ARTICLE 26 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 

Ipswich, "CHAPTER II. ORGANIZATION AND POWERS OF THE TOWN MEETINGS" 

(1) in " Section 1. Annual Town Meeting " by deleting subsection (a) thereof 
and by substituting in lieu thereof the following: 

"(a) The Annual Town Meeting of the Town shall be held on a date and at a 
time as specified by the Board of Selectmen in the Warrant, within the 
first seven calendar days of the month of April; and all business, 
except the election of such officers and the determination of such mat- 
ters as by law or by this chapter are required to be elected or deter- 
mined by ballot, shall be considered at that meeting or at an 
adjournment thereof to another day. That part of the Annual Town 
Meeting devoted to the election of officers and the determination of 
such questions as by law or by this chapter are required to be elected 
or determined by ballot shall be held on a Monday in April not less than 
seven (7) nor more than fourteen (14) days after the first date of said 
meeting, in accordance with the provisions of Section 6." ; and 

(2) in " Section 2. Special Town Meetings ", subsection (a), by deleting 
the first sentence thereof in its entirety; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to accept Article 26 as pre- 
sented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. 
Majority of the Finance Committee did not support this article. Mr. Engel 
agreed on the Saturday Town meeting to get more people to come. He said it 
was not unusual and offers flexibility. The idea was proposed by the 
Government Study Committee. Motion passed on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 27 

To see if the Town will vote to withdraw from membership of the Essex County 
Mosquito Control Project, as provided by the Acts of 1958, Chapter 516, 
Section 4; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Conservation Committee Chairman Lillian North moved that the Town vote to 
accept Article 27 as presented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board, and Master Plan Commission unani 
mously recommended to support this article. Mrs. North listed five reasons 
why the Town should withdraw its membership in the Essex County Mosquito 
Control District: (1) Spraying of Malathion is dangerous; (2) there is ^/ery 
little health threat of mosquitoes carrying disease in Essex County; (3) the 
mosquito-control district is exempt from state and town conservation laws and 
Ipswich has lost some of its wetlands through the district's dredging; (4) 
there is no evidence that the mosquito population has been reduced; and (5) it 
costs $46,000 a year and is not cost effective. 

There were several questions including questions on greenheads which are not 
included in this project. Walter Montgomery, superintendent of the district, 
was given 'permission to speak as a non-resident. He defended the use of 
Malathion, which he said is listed by the EPA as a mildly toxic chemical, less 
dangerous than asperin. He added that the state and federal agencies have 
testified that the district has not damaged wetlands. Mario Marini, a farmer, 
pleaded with voters to reject the article and keep the Town in the district. 
Motion to move the question carried on a unanimous voice vote. Motion to 
withdraw carried by majority voice vote. 



-25- 



ARTICLE 28 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich by adding to the present Section XI. of the Zoning By-Law a 
new subsection "I", as follows, and by re-lettering the present subsections "I" 
through "P", new subsections "J" through "Q": 

"I. Compliance with Zoning and Wetlands Protection By-Laws . 

Any Board with the legal authority to issue any permit, license, special 
permit, and/or variance (herein collectively "permit") may at its 
discretion impose as an essential condition on the issuance and/or 
renewal of any such permit, the requirement that there are and will 
be during the term, or terms, of such permit no violation(s) of the 
Zoning By-Law and/or the "Ipswich Wetlands Protection By-Law", both 
as amended to date, conducted and/or permitted on the lot on which 
such permit is physically located by anyone, including, but not 
limited to, the permittee or licensee. In the event that any zoning 
violation, or violations, occurs on such lot, the permittee or 
licensee shall agree that any such violation(s) may constitute just 
cause for the revocation of such permit at the reasonable discretion 
of such Board. Such condition shall be an essential condition of the 
issuance and continued lawful existence of any such permit." ; and 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 
Ipswich by amending Chapter IV of the General By-Laws by renumbering the pre- 
sent Section "7" as new Section "8", and by adding a new Section "7" as 
follows: 

" Section 7. Compliance with Zoning By-Law and Wetlands Protection By-Law 
Any Board, Commission, officer, and/or Committee with the legal authority, 
to issue any permit and/or license, (herein collectively "permit") may at 
its discretion impose as an essential condition on the issuance and/or 
renewal of any such permit, the requirement that there are and will be 
during the term, or terms, of such permit no violation(s) of the Zoning 
By-Law and/or the "Ipswich Wetlands Protection By-Law", both as amended, 
conducted and/or permitted on the lot on which such permit is physically 
located by anyone, including, but not limited to, the permittee or 
licensee. In the event that any zoning violation, or violations, occurs 
on such lot, the permittee or licensee shall agree that any such 
violation(s) may constitute just cause for the revocation of such permit. 
Such condition shall be an essential element of the issuance and continued 
lawful existence of any such permit." ;. 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to amend The Protective Zoning 
By-Law of the Town of Ipswich by adding to the present Section XI. of the 
Zoning By-Law a new subsection "I", as follows, and by re-lettering the present 
subsections "I" through "0", new subsections "J" through "P": 

"I. Compliance with Zoning By-Law . The Board of Selectmen may at their reason- 
able discretion impose as an essential condition on the issuance and/or 
renewal of any permit and/or license which they are authorized to issue or 
renew , the requirement that there are and will be during the term, or 
terms, of such permit and/or license no violation(s) of the Zoning By-Law 
conducted and/or permitted on the lot on which such permit is located by 

-26- 



anyone, including, but not limited to, the Permittee or Licensee. In the 
event that any zoning violation(s) occurs on such lot as evidenced by the 
failure of compliance with any duly served Cease and Desist Order, the 
Permittee or Licensee shall agree that any such violation(s) may consti- 
tute just cause for the suspension or revocation of such permit or 
license. Such condition may be an essential element of the issuance and 
continued lawful existence of any such permit and/or license. In the 
event that any owner of a lot on which a permit and/or license is located, 
or any Permittee or Licensee, aggrieved by an order or decision of the 
Building Inspector finding that a violation(s) of the Zoning By-Law 
exists on such lot is appealing the Building Inspector's order or decision 
in good faith to the Zoning Board of Appeals or to a court of competent 
jurisdiction, such order or decision shall not constitute the basis for 
the Selectmen to refuse to renew, revoke, and/or suspend any such permit 
and/or license during the pendency of such good faith appeal." Seconded. 

Mr. Engel read the entire amended motion because it was substantially different 
from the article that was advertised in the warrant. This scaled down version 
only applies to the Board of Selectmen. Mr. Engel said the Board of Selectmen 
didn't need to get involved in the wetlands by-law; they felt the wetlands by- 
law was strong enough. This article allows the Board of Selectmen to deny a 
new license, or renewal of a license or permit if conditions relative to cer- 
tain violations exist. He feels this article would be yery effective in terms 
of "jawboning" certain individuals into compliance. Mr. Engel said a license 
is not a right; it is a privilege. Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended. 
Finance Committee recommended 8-1 in favor. Planning Board against original 
motion and in favor of amended motion. Finance Committee Member Jamie Fay was 
opposed to the article and said it would give the Selectmen exceptionally broad 
powers. Mr. Engel feels it is a major issue to make town government work and 
the Board of Selectmen believe it will be effective. Motion passed on a 
majority voice vote. 

ARTICLE 29 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 291 of the 

Acts of 1990, improving emergency telecommunications within the Commonwealth 

and to have the Town Clerk notify the Secretary of the Commonwealth of said 

acceptance no later than December 11, 1991; or to take any other action relative 

thereto. 

Chief of Police Charles Surpitski moved that the Town vote to accept Article 
29 as presented in the Warrant. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee unanimously in favor. Chief Surpitski said we needed this system 
for rapid response during any emergency. The Town will join the expanded Dial 
911 system to improve emergency communication technology. Motion carried una- 
nimously. 

ARTICLE 30 

To see if the Town will vote to discuss the need for a Planning Board Director 

and discuss eliminating this position with saving of this $40,000, more 

or less; expense with our million more or less shortfall of tax money for more 

pressing needs; so as to forestall overrides to pay town equipment, salaries 

and current repairs; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By 

Petition) 

Selectman James Engel moved indefinite postponement of Article 30. Seconded. 
Motion carried unanimously. 



-27- 



ARTICLE 31 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 

Ipswich by adding to Chapter III thereof the following Section 9: 

" Section 9. Zoning By-Law Amendment . No amendment to the Protective 
Zoning By-Law of the Town shall be considered by the Town Meeting unless 
the proposed text of such amendment has first been submitted to the 
Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee no later than ninety days 
prior to such Town Meeting, except for the text of any amendment pro- 
posed by voter petition. Any such text which is not so submitted shall 
not be acted upon by the Town Meeting, or, if presented, shall be ruled 
out of order by the Moderator, unless such unsubmitted text first 
receives the positive recommendations of a majority of both the Board of 
Selectmen and the Finance Committee." ; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Finance Committee Chairman William Craft moved for indefinite postponement. 
Seconded. Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 32 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 

Ipswich by adding to Chapter III thereof the following Section 10: 

" Section 10. Planning Board Report . The Planning Board shall hold a 
public hearing on any article in the warrant for any Town Meeting pro- 
posing any amendment to the Protective Zoning By-Law. Notice of the 
hearing shall be published not less than fourteen (14) days before the 
time of the hearing, and in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. After due consideration of the subject 
matter on all such articles in the warrant, the Planning Board shall 
report in writing thereon at least ten (10) days before the date of such 
Town Meeting to the Town such recommendations as it deems in the best 
interests of the Town. Such report shall contain an analysis of each 
such proposed amendment, especially addressing its intended purpose, the 
changes it purports to effect, any public interests positively or adver- 
sely affected thereby, and its cost and method of enforcement, and shall 
contain recommendations of the Building Inspector and of any and all 
other officers responsible for enforcing such amendment." ; 



or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Finance Committee Member Jamie Fay moved that the Town vote to amend the 
General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich by adding to Chapter III thereof the 
following Section 9: 

" Section 9. Planning Board Report . The Planning Board shall hold a 
public hearing on any article in the warrant for any Town Meeting pro- 
posing any amendment to the Protective Zoning By-Law. Notice of the 
hearing shall be published not less than fourteen (14) days before the 
time of the hearing, and in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 5. After due consideration of the subject 
matter on all such articles in the warrant, the Planning Board shall 
report in writing thereon at least ten (10) days before the date of such 
Town Meeting to the Town such recommendations as it deems in the best 
interests of the Town. Such report shall contain an analysis of each 

-28- 



such proposed amendment, especially addressing its intended purpose, the 
changes it purports to effect, any public interests positively or adver- 
sely affected thereby, and its cost and method of enforcement, and shall 
contain recommendations, if any, of the Building Inspector and of any 
and all other officers responsible for enforcing such amendment." 

Seconded. Finance Committee voted to support this article, Board of 
Selectmen against this article. Planning Board felt this article should be 
postponed for further consideration and encouraged not to pass; Master Plan 
Commission felt the by-law was unnecessary. Finance Committee Member Allen 
Swan spoke in favor. Planning Board Chairman Ken Savoie said the Finance 
Committee did not discuss this with the Planning Board before submitting the 
petition. A 2/3rds vote was necessary. The vote did not pass with 79 for and 
132 against. 

ARTICLE 33 

To see if the Town will vote to accept under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 82, the following public ways, all located in an area 
that continues in a NNE direction from the terminal point of the publicly 
accepted portion of Arrowhead Trail, formerly known as Arrowhead Trail 
Extension Subdivision, substantially as shown on Assessor's Map 31B: 
Arrowhead Trail (formerly Arrowhead Trail Extension), and Arrowhead Circle; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Douglas Laterowicz moved that the Town vote to accept under the provisions of 
applicable Massachusetts General Law the following public way: Arrowhead 
Circle, located in an area formerly known as Arrowhead Trail Extension sub- 
division as substantially shown on Assessor's Map 31B, as further shown on a 
definitive subdivision plan entitled "Arrowhead Circle of Land in Ipswich, MA," 
applicant Douglas S. Laterowicz, prepared by Ryan Engineering Corp., 5 Summer 
Street Court, Nahant, MA: scales as noted, dated July 30, 1986, filed with the 
Office of Town Clerk on July 31, 1986, approved by the Planning Board on 
September 30, 1986, and recorded at the South Essex Registry of Deeds in Plan 
Book 217, Plan 100. 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen against, Finance Committee 6-3 against, Planning 
Board unanimously against the petition. All recommended putting the article 
on the Fall town meeting warrant. Motion fails to pass by voice vote. 

ARTICLE 34 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the 

Town of Ipswich by adding to Chapter V thereof the following Section 6: 

" Section 6. Financial Audit . The Finance Committee shall have the 
authority, subject to appropriation to hire and oversee the services of 
an auditor or auditors in preparing and certifying the audits of the 
financial statements and reports of all Town departments, including 
without limitation all municipal departments, the School Department, the 
Electric Light Department, and the Water and Sewer Departments, and all 
special revenue and trust accounts."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Finance Committee Chairman William Craft moved that the Town vote to accept 
Article 34 as presented in the Warrant. Seconded. Finance Committee 



-29- 



strongly urged support of the article, Board of Selectmen 4-1 against. Mr. 
Engel talked about the Audit Process and urged to vote against. School 
Committee Chairman Cynthia Quinn said the School committee supported the audits 
but did not support Article 34. Mary Conley read an amendment to i ndef ini tiely 
postpone and remand it to the Government Study Committee with instructions to 
seek input from the Finance Committee, School Committee, and Board of Selectmen 
and to report back to the Fall Town Meeting. Finance Committee Members Mr. Fay 
and Mr. Craft spoke against the amendment to postpone. 

On a handcount with 112 in favor and 76 against, the amended motion was passed. 
Motion was indefinitely postponed. 

ARTICLE 35 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous articles 

raising and appropriating money contained in this warrant for the purpose of 

completing a budget which is balanced and in compliance with the levy limit 

provisions of Proposition 2£, so called; or to take any other action relative 

thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion 
carried unanimously. 

Moderator James Grimes thanked Mr. Fortado, the Department of Public Works, and 
the Board of Registrars for their help in setting up for the Town Meeting. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested copies 
thereof at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, by 
publication at least seven days prior to the time for holding said meeting in 
a newspaper published in, or having a general circulation in, the Town of 
Ipswich . 

Given unto our hands this 18th day of March in the year of our Lord, One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and Ninety-one. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James R. Engel 
Wil 1 iam E. George 
Patrick J. McNally 
Wil 1 iam I . Walton 
Charles J. Wayne 



-30- 



1991 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby 

directed to notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, 

qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet in the IPSWICH HIGH 

SCHOOL, in said Ipswich, on MONDAY, THE FOURTH OF NOVEMBER, 1991, 

at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the 

following articles, viz: 

Moderator James Grimes called the meeting to order at 7:45 p.m. 

with 217 voters present. The final count was 344 at 9:00 p.m. 

Town Manager George Howe led the Pledge of Allegiance to the 

flag. 

It was moved, seconded and so voted to admit non-voters. 

The Moderator thanked all the participants who had helped in 

preparing for this meeting. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were Raymond Barrows, Lawrence 

Cummings, Eugene Hailson, Coco McCabe and Joni Soffron. 



ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning 
By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as follows; 

by amending the Zoning Map, noted in SECTION IV . C. of the 
Protective Zoning By-law, by redesignating a portion of 
that zone presently designated as Industrial (I) to Rural Resi- 
dence C (RRC) : 

The area to be redesignated as Rural Residence C is generally 
described and bounded by the Boston and Maine Railroad right-of- 
way (northeasterly) , to the center line of Muddy Run (norther- 
ly),^ the centerline of the Egypt River (easterly and southeast- 
erly) , to the centerline of Paradise Road (southerly) , to a point 
300' south of the centerline of Paradise Road (southerly) , to a 
point approximately 3 00 'southeasterly from the intersection of 
Paradise Road and High Street, and running in a line parallel and 
300' back from the centerline of High Street (southerly) , to the 
centerline of Muddy Run, then following the centerline of Muddy 
Run to its intersection with the centerline of Clamshell Road 
(northerly) , to the intersection of Clamshell Road with the 
property line of the parcel designated on Town Assessor's Maps as 
Map 21, parcel 3 6 (southerly) , to the intersection with the 
Boston and Maine Railroad right-of-way (easterly) ; said area to 
be redesignated is further described as the shaded area included 
on the map below. 



-31- 




Shaded area to be 
changed Irom 
Industrial I to Rural 
Residence C(RRC) 



;or to take any other action relative thereto. 



Chairman of the Master Plan Commission, Leslie Brooks moved that 
the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town 
of Ipswich as presented in Article 1 of the warrant for the 
November 4, 1991, special town meeting. Motion seconded. 

Ms. Brooks explained the Master Plan Commission's recommendation 
to rezone about 3 00 acres of industrial land in the Paradise Road 
area to RRC. Rezoning this area would allow landowners to build 
housing there while all existing uses are grandfathered. Board 
of Selectmen unanimously voted to accept the motion. Finance 
Committee majority voted 6 - 3 to support this article. Select- 
man Charles Wayne and Finance Committee Chairman Bill Craft spoke 
in favor. Finance Committee member, Jamie Fay, speaking for the 
minority on the committee, said residents should be careful 
about losing elements of diversity in Ipswich. He said this plan 
would reduce the amount of land set aside for industry to 1.5 
percent and proposed looking at other sites around town to regain 
some of that percentage. John Connery, planning consultant for 
the Master Plan Commission, said under this plan, the owner has 
an option. This redevelopment option provides a little flexibil- 
ity, vision and direction for the community. Answering resi- 
dent's questions, Mr. Connery said there was a possibility of 125 
to 13 house lots and there would be no impact on the railroad 
right-of-way. On a hand count the motion passed with 23 3 for and 
41 against. 

Special thanks to town employee, Howard Bowen, who replaced the 
defective sound system with the system from the Winthrop School. 

Article 2 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By- 
Law of the Town of Ipswich, 

1) by deleting Section IX. C. thereof in its entirety; and 



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2) by inserting in lieu thereof the following: 

"C. Water Supply Protection Districts . There are hereby estab- 
lished within the Town of Ipswich certain groundwater and 
surface water supply districts, consisting of aquifers, aquifer 
recharge areas and drainage areas to surface water reservoirs. 
These districts have been established as a result of extensive 
and continued study by the Town of Ipswich and its consultants, 
Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (see Report to the Town of Ipswich, 
Massachusetts on Hydrogeologic Study for a Groundwater Protection 
Program, March, 1983 by Metcalf and Eddy, Inc.) Aquifer and 
aquifer recharge areas are defined by standard geologic and 
hydrologic investigations which may include drilling observation 
wells, utilizing existing boring and pumping test data, strati- 
graphic profiles, conducting seismic surveys or other geophysical 
techniques, and geologic mapping. Drainage areas are defined by 
topography. The Water Supply Districts themselves, the land 
above the aquifer, and the most significant recharge and drainage 
areas have been established to protect the health, safety, and 
welfare of the citizens by insuring the purity and adequacy of 
their municipal water supply. It is intended to insure that the 
land use and development will not, during construction or there- 
after, have an adverse effect on the aquifers which feed the 
municipal wells or on the watersheds that feed these aquifers. 
These protection districts consist of: 

Water Supply District A 

All lots which contain: 

a. permeable deposits within the Area of Influence and in 
hydraulic connection with the municipal wells, or 

b. areas contiguous to the permeable deposits, within the 
Area of Influence of the Essex and Fellow's Road Wells, and of 
the Winthrop Wells, 1,2, and 3, or 

c. areas contiguous to the permeable deposits in which the 
prevailing direction of both groundwater flow and surface water 
runoff is toward the permeable deposits, within the Area of 
Influence of the Brown's Well and Mile Lane Wells, or 

d. the area contiguous or non-contiguous to the Dow's Brook 
and Bull Brook Reservoirs in which surface and groundwater flow 
is in the direction of and contributing to the reservoirs and 
their tributaries. 

. Water Supply District B 

All lots which contain areas within the Area of Influence of the 
Brown's and Mile Lane Wells in which the prevailing direction of 
surface water flow is away from the permeable deposits. 

The boundaries of the Water Supply Districts are delineated on a 
map at a scale of one inch to 1,000 feet entitled "Water Supply 

-33- 



Districts of the Town of Ipswich, 1983" and on the current Zoning 
Map of the Town of Ipswich, both of which are on file in the 
Office of the Town Clerk. 

1. Uses in the District 

Within the Water Supply Districts all of the requirements of 
the underlying zoning district (s) continue to apply except that 
uses designated with a dash (-) in the Water Supply Districts- 
Table of Uses shall not be permitted and uses designated with an 
SPB may be permitted by special permit from the- Planning Board, 
even where underlying district requirements are more permissive. 
Where there is a "P" designation, the underlying zoning district 
requirements are controlling. In both districts floor drains 
within a building or structure are not permitted, except where 
connected to contained and/or sealed drainage systems. 

WATER SUPPLY DISTRICTS - TABLE OF USES 

DISTRICT A DISTRICT B 

The sale, use and storage of hazardous - SPB 

and toxic materials, in excess of 25 

gallons and/or 75 pounds dry weight, except 

for the storage of petroleum or other 

refined petroleum products which heat the 

building 

The manufacture, disposal, dumping and/or 
discharge of hazardous and toxic 
materials. 

The operation of a junk or salvage yard 

The operation of a sanitary landfill 

The operation of an automotive and/or boat - - 

repair facility and/or accessory repair 

facility 

The operation of a dry cleaning facility 
(except for pick-up service) 

The operation of a commercial - - 

and/or private car washing facility 

Sewage treatment facilities with on-site 
disposal of primary or secondary treatment 
effluent, or package sewage treatment 
plants 

Metal plating 

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Chemical and/or bacteriological 
laboratories, except as accessory to 
the primary use 

Wholesale distribution and/or warehousing 
of commercial liquid petroleum products of 
any kind, including Class A,B and C motor 
fluids, except as permitted below 

Storage enclosed within any permitted P P 

building of fuel sources for heating, 
ventilation and/or air conditioning 
(HVAC) systems for principal and/or 
accessory buildings on said lot. 

Installation or replacement of underground - - 

tanks for the storage of hazardous materials, 

including heating fuel, except for replacement 

of legally pre-existing commercial storage 

tanks 

Storage of road salts and/or chemical 

de-icing materials - - 

Disposal of solid wastes and/or sludges - SPB 

other than brush and stumps 

Installation or replacement of on-site P P 

septic system (s) with a design capacity 
of up to and including 600 gallons per day 
per acre 

Installation or replacement of on-site SPB SPB 

septic system (s) with a design capacity 
greater than 600 gallons per day per acre 

On-site discharge or disposal of - 

industrial wastes 



Application of animal manures applied P 
to the soil as fertilizer 

Stockpiling agricultural wastes generated SPB 
outside the district in quantities exceeding 
fifty (50) cubic yards for periods exceeding 
two (2) weeks 

Storage of fertilizers, pesticides, 
and herbicides outdoors 

Storage of leachable materials (other than 

-35- 



those noted above) outdoors unless on 
surfaces which are constructed of 
impermeable material and/or designed with a 
dike or lip to contain spills 

Rendering impermeable more than twenty (20%) SPB P 

percent of any lot 

Excavating and/or drilling to a depth P SPB 

greater than fifteen (15) feet below existing 

grade 



2. Special Permit Criteria 

a.) Special permits shall be granted only if the Planning 
Board determines that in addition to the requirements of Section 
XI. I., the owner and applicant have demonstrated that at the 
boundaries of the premises the groundwater quality resulting from 
on-site waste disposal, other on-site operations, natural re- 
charge, and background water quality 1) will not fall below the 
standards established by the Massachusetts Department of Environ- 
mental Protection (DEP) in "Drinking Water Standards of Massachu- 
setts", or 2) where existing groundwater is already below those 
standards, will not be further degraded. In order to make these 
determinations the applicant shall hire a Registered Professional 
Engineer or professional qualified in the area of groundwater 
hydrogeology , hydrology, and/or chemistry to study the property 
and conduct a series of on-site groundwater monitoring tests. 
Water samples shall be drawn from shall groundwater wells and 
tested, in accordance with Massachusetts Department of Environ- 
mental Protection "Drinking Water Standards of Massachusetts". 
Additionally, the Planning Board may engage a Registered Profes- 
sional Engineer or professional qualified in the area of ground- 
water hydrogeology, hydrology and/or chemistry to review the 
application containing said groundwater analyses and shall charge 
the applicant for the cost of the review. 



b.) In reviewing applications for special permits, and in 
imposing conditions thereon, the Planning Board shall consider 
the effect of sewage, stormwater runoff, and chemicals used in 
conjunction with the proposed activity on the quality and quanti- 
ty of surface water and groundwater. Pursuant to this section, 
the Planning Board may, on a case-by-case basis, impose specific 
design and/or performance standards necessary to ensure that the 
proposed use is in harmony with the purposes of this By-Law. In 
imposing conditions the Planning Board shall give consideration 
to the simplicity, reliability and feasibility of the control 
measures proposed and the degree of threat to water quality which 
would result if the control measures were to fail. 



-36- 



c.) In all cases a special permit shall be issued for a 
specific location. Special permits issued for drilling below 
fifteen feet (15') for a residential well shall run with the 
land. In all other cases special permits shall run with the 
specific business, owner and/or corporate entity applying for 
said special permit. 

d.) Special permits may be transferred or assigned, provided 
however, that the transferree or assignee: a) continues to use 
the property for the use permitted by, and in accordance with the 
terms of the special permit; and b) applies to the Planning Board 
for an amendment to the special permit as to the change of name 
of the holder of the permit. 

3. Monitoring 

Periodic monitoring of existing on-site groundwater monitor- 
ing wells and/or permission to install new wells on the appli- 
cant's property may be required by the Planning Board as a 
condition of the special permit. Such monitoring may include 
sampling of wastewater disposed to on-site septic systems or 
cesspools, or to drywells, and sampling from groundwater monitor- 
ing wells to be located and constructed as specified in the 
special permit. Reports shall be submitted to the Planning Board 
and the Board of Health, and costs shall be borne by the appli- 
cant. 

4 . Fees 

Any special permit issued pursuant to this Section IX. C. , 
may by its terms require the holder of the special permit to pay 
fees relating to the monitoring of the water quality of the 
district. Fees shall be established by the Planning Board 
Special Permit Rules and Regulations and, in accordance with 
Chapter 40A, Sections 9 and 11, there shall be a public hearing 
to establish fees. Fees shall not be increased more frequently 
than once every three (3) years." ; and 

3) by amending SECTION V. "D. Table of Use Regulations " 
by adding to the end of the fourth paragraph thereof, following 
the words "...and outgoing material.", the following sentence: 
"In the event a special permit is issued under SECTION IX . C. 
of this By-Law, the applicant shall not be required to obtain a 
separate special permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals for the 
treatment or storage of hazardous or toxic materials pursuant to 
the provisions of SECTION V. D. " ; or to take any other action 
relative' thereto. 

Planning Board Chairman, Catherine Savoie moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich 
as presented in Article 2 of the warrant for the November 4 , 
1991, special town meeting. Motion seconded. 

-37- 



Mrs. Savoie explained the revisions and administrative changes in 
the Water Supply District By-Law. She said the original by-law 
approved in 1983 became an administrative nightmare for the 
Planning Board and probably the same for those who came before 
the board for special permits. The new by-law was a combined 
effort between the Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and the 
business community. The Planning Board unanimously recommended 
to support this article with one minority viewpoint--that they 
should allow automotive repair shops. Board of Selectmen unani- 
mously supported this article. Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men, James Engel said the original by-law, which covers one third 
of the area in town, has been successful in the past eight years. 
The new by-law spells out what is and is not allowed in the 
district. "Risk Management is what we're talking about here, " 

said Engel. Finance Committee unanimously recommended to support 
this article. Motion carried unanimously on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town of Ipswich will vote to amend the Protective 
Zoning By-law of the Town of Ipswich as follows: 

1) by deleting the following definitions from " SECTION III. 
DEFINITIONS ": 

"SIGN: Any letters, pictorial representation, symbol, flag, 
emblem, illuminated or animated device displayed in any manner 
whatsoever, which directs attention of persons off the premises 
on which the sign is displayed to any object, subject, place, 
person, activity, product, service, institution, organization or 
business. " ; 

"SIGN, AREA OF: The area, including all lettering, wording, 
and accompanying designs and symbols, together with the back- 
ground on which they are displayed, and frame around the sign and 
any "cut-outs" or extensions, but not including any supporting 
structure or bracing: or for a sign consisting of individual 
letters or symbols attached to a surface, building, wall or 
window, the smallest area enclosed by a series of straight lines 
connected at right angles to triangle or circle which encompasses 
all of the letters and symbols; or for a sign consisting of a 
three-dimensional object, the area of the largest vertical cross- 
section of the object. In computing the area of signs, both 
sides of V-shaped signs, but only one side of back-to-back signs, 
shall be counted."; 

"SIGN, FRONTAGE: The width or length of a space occupied by 
a separate and distinct use which borders on a street or a 
private way accessible from a street, measured, in feet, parallel 
to said street or private way."; 



-38- 



"SIGN, ON PREMISES: Any sign that advertises or indicates 
the person occupying the premises on which the sign is erected or 
maintained, or the business transacted thereon, or advertises the 
property itself or any part thereof as for sale or rent, and 
which contains no other matter."; 

"SIGN, PORTABLE: A sign designed for the purpose of adver- 
tising, having ease of movement and placement and not attached to 
a permanent structure. A sign attached to a trailer shall be 
considered a portable sign."; 

"SIGN, STANDING: A sign that is not attached to a build- 
ing . " ; 

"SIGN, TEMPORARY: Any sign, including its supporting 
structure, intended to be maintained for a continuous period of 
not more than fifteen (15) days in any calendar year."; and 

2) by deleting SECTION VIII. SIGNS " in its entirety and by adding 
in lieu thereof the new " SECTION VIII. SIGNS ." as follows: 

" SECTION VIII. SIGNS 

A. Purpose 

The purpose of this By-Law is to regulate all exterior signs 
and all interior signs placed for exterior viewing from public 
ways and places but which are not located on Town property. It is 
also intended to limit clutter of uncontrolled signage, to 
integrate signs with Ipswich's unique and historic environment, 
and to improve the effectiveness of individual signs through 
emphasis on appropriate design. 

B. Application 

A sign, whether temporary or permanent, shall require a 
building permit and shall comply with the Massachusetts State 
Building Code, as amended. Flags and temporary signs for politi- 
cal or charitable purposes, for public organizations, for states 
and political subdivisions thereof, and international and nation- 
al flags are exempt from the provisions of this section. Signs 
attached to trailers shall not be allowed; signs attached to 
vehicles shall not be allowed within fifty feet (50') of the 
street line. Signs shall not project above the roof or front 
parapet of a building. 

C. Definitions 

Area of Sign : The area, including all lettering, wording, 
and accompanying designs and symbols, together with the back- 
ground on which they are displayed, the frame around the sign, 
and any "cut outs" or extensions, but not including any support- 
ing structure or bracing. Calculation of sign areas shall use 
the following formulae: 

-39- 



1. For two-dimensional signs affixed to or fabricated from 
a mounting background or sign board: the area shall consist of 
the smallest rectangular plane which wholly contains the sign 
(see diagram #1) . 

2. For two-dimensional signs consisting of individual 
letters or symbols affixed directly to the building wall, window, 
or awning: the area shall consist of the smallest area enclosed 
by a series of straight lines connected at right angles which 
encompasses all of the letters and symbols (see diagram #2) . 

3. For two-dimensional double-faced signs less than four 
(4) inches thick: use the area of one face as calculated under 
subparagraph #1 above. 

4. For three-dimensional signs, double-faced signs greater 
than four (4) inches thick, objects used as signs, and "V" shaped 
signs: the area shall be determined by the largest of either the 
front or side projected view of the sign (see diagram #3) . 

Bracket : A device used to attach a sign to a building other than 
with screws or bolts. 

Clearance : A completely open and unobstructed space measured 
from the ground level to the lowest portion of a hanging sign. No 
less than ten feet (10') clearance shall be allowed when the sign 
is over a public way or area (see diagram #4) . 

Illumination : The act of supplying or brightening a sign with 
light. Lighted signs shall be illuminated only by a steady, 
stationary light without causing harmful glare for motorists, 
pedestrians or neighboring premises. Sign illumination is 
permitted only between the hours of seven o'clock in the morning 
and eleven o'clock in the evening, except that signs may be 
illuminated during any hours establishments are open to the 
public. The sources of artificial light shall include: enclosed 
or protected neon (exposed illuminated neon shall not be al- 
lowed) ; and lighting from an exterior source (s) and/or internal 
lighting; but all flashing, changing, or intermittent illumina- 
tion is prohibited, except for time /temperature signs and holiday 
decorations. 

Lineal Frontage : The length in feet of a building or storefront 
which abuts a street or public right-of-way at its first floor or 
entrance level (see diagram #5) . 

Projection : To extend forward or out from a facade of a build- 
ing. Signs shall project no more than five feet (5') from a 
building or two-thirds (2/3) of the width of the sidewalk, 
whichever is less (see diagram #4) . 



-40- 



Diagram 




DIAGRAM 2 








diagram 3 






Dl 


tGRAM ^ 




r ^\ 


t".i 


; % ckT«m/' 




_ : A;-i^' :"i 

y 7 -« »• 



< r x 




■<;- »ns 



Sign : Any two or three dimensional fabrication, or assembly, 
including its supporting structure, consisting of any letter, 
figure, character, symbol, emblem, mark, design, pictorial 
representation, stripe, line, trademark, reading matter or 
illuminating device, constructed, attached, erected, fastened, or 
manufactured in any manner whatsoever so that the same shall be 
used for the attraction of the public to any place, subject, 
person, firm, corporation, business, public performance, article, 
machine or merchandise whatsoever, and displayed in any manner 
for recognized identification or advertising purposes. "Signs" 
shall be divided into the following categories: 

1. Awning Sign : Any sign painted, sewn or attached onto an 
awning. The area of an awning sign(s) shall not exceed one- 
half (0.5) square foot per foot of lineal frontage of the 
storefront or building upon which the awning is attached. 
Awnings shall conform to the Massachusetts State Building 
Code. 

2. Banner Sign : Any sign constructed of fabric or flexible 
material. Pennants and flags are banner signs, except 
flags or pennants as exempted under Subsection B 



-41- 



(Application) . Banner signs may be used as permanent and 
temporary signs. A permanent banner sign shall not exceed 
fifteen (15) square feet in size. 

3. Directory Sign : Any sign which contains listings of two 
or more commercial uses or users. A directory sign shall 

be designed and constructed with provisions for changes of 
listing without reconstruction of the entire sign. 

4. Free-standing sign : Any sign structurally separate from 
the building, being supported on itself, on a standard, or 
on legs. Free-standing signs shall be non-moveable and 
permanently anchored. 

5. Plague or Historic Marker : A permanent, non-illuminated 
sign which identifies a structure or site designated by the 
Ipswich Historical Commission as being historically 
significant. In the case of a structure, said sign shall be 
attached parallel to the structure and shall not exceed 
three (3) square feet. In the case of a site, said sign 
shall be placed on the structure or shall be free-standing, 
and shall not exceed three (3) square feet in area. The sign 
area for a plaque or historic marker shall not be figured in 
the allowable sign area for the building. 

6. Sandwich Board Sign : A sign structurally separate from 
a building and being supported on itself, usually on legs; a 
sandwich board sign shall be moveable and without permanent 
anchoring. Said sign shall not be more than six (6) 
square feet in area, as calculated for two-dimensional 
double-faced signs (see diagram #1) , shall be constructed of 
materials intended for outdoor use and shall not impair 
visibility or ability to use any public way or public area. 

Spacing : The distance between the letters in a word, between 
individual words, and/or between lettering and any other 
components of a sign. 

Special Permit Granting Authority : The Town of Ipswich Zoning 
Board of Appeals. 

Temporary Sign : A sign which is intended for a limited period 
of display. A temporary sign may be erected for a period not 
to exceed the time frames listed in the following categories. 
A temporary sign which does not meet the following criteria 
shall be subject to the same requirements as for permanent 
signs. 

1. Poster-type signs, construction signs, and real estate 
signs are considered temporary signs provided they meet the 
following necessary criteria: 



-42- 



a) Poster-type sign: 

- may not occupy more than 15% of the window area and 
may not be attached to the exterior surface of the 
window 

shall be related to use conducted or goods available 
on the premises 

may not be used for more than twenty-one (21) 
consecutive calendar days. 

b) Construction sign: 

identifies parties involved in construction on the 

same premises only 

shall not contain advertising 

shall not be utilized for more than one (1) year, or 

for the duration of work on the lot, whichever is 

longer 

- shall not exceed ten (10) square feet in area 
shall be removed promptly by contractor within 
fourteen (14) calendar days of the completion of 
work. 

c) Real Estate sign: 

shall be related to sale, rental, or lease of same 

lot 

shall not be more than four (4) square feet in area 

shall be removed within seven (7) calendar days 

after sale, rental, or lease. 

2. Any banner sign shall be considered a temporary sign 
provided it meets the following criteria: 

a) A banner sign intended to advertise a business 
establishment prior to permanent signing: 

shall be erected for a maximum of thirty (30) 

calendar days 

shall be no larger than twenty (20) square feet in 

area per business 

shall be attached to the building. 

b) A banner sign intended to advertise a special 
event : 

shall be no greater than thirty (3 0) square feet in 
area if placed across a public street; otherwise, 
shall be no greater than twenty (20) square feet in 
area 
-. shall be erected for a maximum of sixty (60) 
calendar days, and 

shall be removed within three (3) calendar days 
after the event is over. 

3. A sandwich board sign shall be considered a temporary 
sign provided that it meets the following criteria: 



-43- 



a) the sign is intended to advertise a special event 
or seasonal product 

b) it shall be erected for a maximum of thirty (30) 
calendar days within any twelve-month period. 

Wall Sign : Any sign painted on or affixed to a building wall is 
a wall sign. Wall signs consist of two basic categories: 

1. Directly applied: painted, or three-dimensional letters 
applied directly to a building surface. 

2. Independent Wall Sign: painted, incised or three- 
dimensional letters affixed to a sign board which is then 
attached to a building surface. 

Window Sign : Any temporary or permanent sign affixed to the 
surface of the glass of any part of any building. Window sign(s) 
shall not occupy, in total, more than fifteen percent (15%) of 
the glass area and may not be attached to the exterior surface of 
the glass. Any interior sign which is within three feet (3') of 
the window glass and which is visible from the outside of the 
building shall be considered a window sign even though it may not 
be affixed directly to the glass. Window displays of actual 
products or merchandise for sale or rent on the business premises 
shall not be considered window signs. 

D. Sign Requirements per Zoning District 

No sign shall be permitted except that which meets the following 

requirements: 

1. In Rural Residence A,B, and C and in Intown Residence 
Districts, signs for residential uses, except street numbers 
and names of occupants, may not be illuminated. The follow- 
ing signs are permitted: 

a) one sign displaying the street number and name or names 
of the occupants of the premises, not exceeding two (2) 
square feet in area; 

b) one sign not exceeding two (2) square feet in area 
limited to the identification of a permitted home 
occupation; 

c) one real estate sign; 

d) one construction sign; 

e) one historic plaque or marker; and/or 

f) one free-standing sign per main entrance of any 
subdivision or multi-family development, which shall not 
exceed twelve (12) square feet in area. The top of the 
sign shall be no higher than four (4) feet above grade, 
the sign shall be no closer than ten (10) feet to the 
street line, and the sign shall not impair visibility or 
ability to use any public way or area. 



-44- 



2. In Rural Residence A, B, and C and in Intown Residence 
Districts, the following signs shall be allowed for non- 
conforming business uses, and for religious, educational, 
public, philanthropic or agricultural uses: 

a) all signs listed in D.l a) through f ) ; 

b) one temporary banner sign ; 

c) one wall sign which shall be no greater than twenty (20) 
square feet (or the size of the existing sign) , whichev 
er is smaller, ; 

d) one temporary sandwich board sign by Special Permit. 

3. In Business Districts along Routes 133 and 1A (from the 
southeasterly property line of the Bruni property - Map 54C, 
Parcel 22A- to Saltonstall Brook; from Kimball Avenue to 
Mile Lane; and within the Business-zoned property at the 
Rowley Town line) and in the Planned Commercial District and 
business uses along the Newburyport Turnpike (Route One) , 
the following signs shall be permitted: 

a) all signs listed in D.l. a) through f ) ; 

b) one banner sign; 

c) one wall sign which shall be no greater than thirty (30) 
square feet per business; 

d) one free-standing directory sign for lots with two (2) 
or more businesses and for all uses in common ownership. 
Said sign shall be no greater than fifty (50) square 
feet in total area, with each business having a maximum 
of eight (8) square feet in area, and which may include 
up to twenty (20) square feet for the name and/ or 
address of the business complex. For lots containing a 
single business use, one free-standing sign of twenty 

(20) square feet in total area shall be allowed. Said 
sign(s) shall not be located within ten feet (10') of 
the street line, shall have a clearance of four feet 
(4') above grade to the bottom of the sign, and shall 
not impair visibility or ability to use any public way 
or area; 

e) Of f -premises, free-standing signs, each of which shall 
not be more than twenty (20) square feet in area may 
be permitted by special permit; 

f) One sandwich board sign which shall be located no closer 
than fifty feet (50') to the street line; 

g) Window sign(s) ; 
h) Awning sign(s) . 

4. In Business and Industrial-zoned Districts within the 
center of Ipswich (Lord Square, Washington Street, Downtown 
Business District, and South Main Street) the following 
signs are permitted for business and industrial uses: 

a) All signs allowed in D.l, a) through f ) ; 



-45- 



b) Hanging signs which are supported by a building wall or 
bracket. Any such sign shall not exceed eight (8) 
square feet in area and shall not have a projection 
greater than five feet (5') from the building or two- 
thirds (2/3) of the width of the sidewalk, whichever is 
less. Each sign shall also have required clearance (see 
diagram #4) ; 

c) one wall sign which shall be no greater than twenty (20) 
square feet per business 

d) one banner sign. Any such banner sign shall meet the 
projection and clearance requirements for hanging signs 
if projecting from the building; 

e) window signs; 

f) one sandwich board sign; 

g) awning sign(s) 

5. In all Limited Industrial (LI) and all Industrial 
Districts, except those found in the center of Ipswich, the 
following signs are permitted: 

a) all signs found in Paragraph #3., with the exception 
that wall signs shall be no greater than twenty (20) 
square feet in area. 

6. In all districts the following additional signs are 
permitted: 

a) any free-standing sign, not exceeding four (4) square 
feet in area, identifying an exit, an entrance, and/or a 
parking area situated at or near each entrance, 
provided that no portion of the sign shall be greater 
than three feet (3') above grade; and 

b) one sign attached to the building wall, not exceeding 
four (4) square feet in area, at the rear of a building, 
for the sole purpose of facilitating deliveries, en- 
trance by the public from a rear parking lot, or direc- 
tional or warning signs pertaining to traffic or parking 
directions. 



7. In no event shall the total area of all allowed signs, 
as described in Subsections D.2., D.3., D.4., and D.5. 
above, exceed twenty percent (20%) of the total first floor 
building facade area of each business or allowed use. The 
first floor building facade area shall be calculated by 
multiplying the lineal frontage of a building or storefront 
by its total first floor or entrance level height (see 
diagram #5) . 

E. Non-conformance of Signs 

Any sign legally erected before the adoption of this By-Law which 

does not conform to the provisions of this By-Law may continue to 

-46- 



be maintained without a permit, provided that any such sign shall 
conform to the provisions thereof if, after the adoption of the 
By-Law, it is enlarged, altered, replaced, changed, or relocated. 
Any exemption provided for in this section of the By-Law shall 
terminate with respect to any sign which: 



or 



1. Advertises a permitted use which has been discontinued; 

2. Advertises or calls attention to any product, business, 
or activity which is no longer sold or carried on, whether 
generally or on the premises. 

F. Permit and Appeal 

1. No person shall install, erect, or alter a sign without 
having obtained in advance a building permit for said sign. 

2. Any appeal under sub-sections B.,C.,or D. shall be made 
to the Zoning Board of Appeals." ; and 

3) by amending SECTION XI .ADMINISTRATION D. Building Application 
and Permit Fees . #7. by adding after the word "each" the follow- 
ing language: 

", except for temporary signs. The fee for temporary signs 
shall be an annual fee of twenty-five (25) dollars."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board member, Tom Mayo moved that the Town vote to amend 
the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as presented 
in Article 3 of the warrant for the November 4, 1991, special 
town meeting. Motion seconded. 

Mr. Mayo explained the purpose of the by-law and the proposed 
changes. The Planning Board worked closely with the business 
community on all the proposed changes to the by-law. Board of 
Selectmen were undecided and still "wrestling" with fees for 
temporary signs. Mr. Mayo explained that there would be a $2 5. 
annual fee for all temporary signs on a particular site. After 
the explanation, Mr. Engel proposed the following amendment to 
Article 3: by deleting the following sentence, in the proposed 
amendment to Section XI. D. 7.: "The fee for temporary signs shall 
be an annual fee of twenty-five ($25.) dollars"; and by substi- 
tuting therefore the following sentence: "There shall be no fee 
for temporary signs." Board of Selectmen unanimously urged 
support for the amendment. Finance Committee also supported the 
amendment and with the amendment, supported the main motion. 
Motion carried on a voice vote for the amendment and the amend- 
ment was included in the main motion. 

A member of the Ipswich Merchant's Association, Eugene Hailson 
said the association was actively involved in writing the sign 
by-law and unanimously supported this article. 



-47- 



Board of Selectmen unanimously supported the main motion. 
Attorney, Don Greenough asked the Board of Selectmen to further 
modify the by-law by removing permit requirements. Mr. Mayo said 
the sign by-law is enforced by the Building Inspector and asked 
the new building inspector to comment. Building Inspector, Allen 
Fraser said whatever town meeting passes, his office will comply 
with and minimize paperwork. The voice vote was inconclusive; on 
a hand count the main motion carried 219 for and 26 against. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By- 
Law of the Town of Ipswich, SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY 
REGULATIONS " 

(1) by deleting subsection " F. Accessory Building Requirements ." 
in its entirety and by substituting in lieu thereof the follow- 
ing: 

"F. Accessory Building Requirements . Detached accessory buildings 
are permitted in the side and/or rear yards in all districts, and 
by Special Permit of the Zoning Board of Appeals are permitted in 
the front yard in Rural Residence Districts. Accessory buildings 
shall be located on the same lot as the principal building or use 
provided that not more than twenty-five (25) percent of a minimum 
lot area shall be so occupied and, further, that an accessory 
building shall not be located nearer than ten (10') feet from the 
principal building. An accessory building may be located not 
closer than one half (1/2) the side and rear yard requirements 
for all districts and in the Rural Residence Districts the 
minimum front yard requirement of the district in which it is 
located shall apply. 

An accessory building attached to its principal building shall be 
considered an integral part thereof."; and 

(2) by amending subsection "B. Table of Dimensional and Density 
Regulations" by including the following district categories with 
dimensional requirements: 

"District Minimum Yards 

Front(l)(7) Side (2) (7) Rear (2) (7) 

Rural Residence 

(RRA,RRB &RRC) 

Accessory Structures 50 2 15 



Intown Residence 2 5 10 

Accessory Structures 



-48- 



Business 

Accessory Structures 3 5 5 10 



Planned Commercial 
Accessory Structures 


13 
50 




13 
12.5 


13 
25 


Industrial 
Accessory Structures 


6 
50 




12.5 


25 


Limited Industrial 
Accessory Structures 


14, 
50 


,15 


14 
12.5 


14 
25 "; 



or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Chairman, Catherine Savoie moved to indefinitely 
postpone action on this article. Motion seconded. Board of 
Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. Motion 
carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Protective Zoning By- 
law of the Town of Ipswich" by deleting from SECTION V .D. TABLE 
OF USE REGULATIONS" under the subheading "ACCESSORY USES" the 
following: 



RRA RRB RRC IR B PC LI 
"Unregistered motor 
vehicles: 

Two (2) or less P P P PPPPP 

More than two (2) 

in an enclosed 

building P P P PPPPP 

More than two (2) 

in an enclosed 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 
building SBA SBA SBA SBA SBA SBA SBA 

SBA" 

and by inserting in lieu thereof the following: 

" RRA RRB RRC IR B PC LI 

-49- 



Unregistered motor 
vehicles: 

One (1) not in 
an enclosed 
building P 

More than one (1) 
not in an enclosed 
building, but 
limited to one (1) 
per each whole 
acre in the Rural 10 
Residence zone. SBA 



10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


SBA 


SBA 


SBA 


SBA 


SBA 


SBA 



Up to four (4) 
all within an 
enclosed building P 



More than four 


(4) 












in an enclosed 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


building 


SBA 


SBA 


- SBA 


SBA 


SBA 


SBA" ; 



or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board member, John Beagan moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich as 
presented in Article 5 of the warrant for the November 4, 1991, 
special town meeting. Motion seconded. 

Mr. Beagan explained the proposed changes in the number of 
unregistered motor vehicles allowed in Ipswich. Planning Board, 
Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. 
Motion carried unanimously. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By- 
law, SECTION III. DEFINITIONS as follows: 

1. within the Definition of "INN" (a) by adding a period (.) 
after the word "others"; and b) by deleting the words "limited to 
not more than six bedrooms for guests and three hundred (300) 
square feet of dining area."; 

2. by deleting the definition of "FAMILY" in its entirety; 

3. by adding the following new definition in its proper alpha- 
betical sequence: 

"PRIVATE GUEST HOUSE: an accessory residential building which 
does not have kitchen or cooking facilities and which is clearly 



-50- 



accessory to the principal dwelling unit."; 

4. by deleting the definition "CLUSTER" in its entirety; 

5. by adding the definition "INDUSTRIAL WASTE" in its proper 
alphabetical sequence: 

"INDUSTRIAL WASTE: Any waste resulting from any process of 
industry, manufacture, trade or business, or from the development 
or recovery of any natural resource."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Chairman, Catherine Savoie moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich 
as presented in Article 6 of the warrant for the November 4 , 
1991, special town meeting. Motion seconded. 

Mrs. Savoie made a motion to amend the original motion by delet- 
ing #2: "by deleting the definition of "FAMILY" in its entire- 
ty", therefore retaining the definition "FAMILY" as it currently 
exists in the by-law. Amended motion seconded. Planning Board, 
Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in favor of 
the amendment. Mrs. Savoie gave a definition of "FAMILY" and 
explained that there are two other by-laws that depend upon the 
definition of "FAMILY". Motion on the amendment carried unani- 
mously. 

Finance Committee Chairman, Bill Craft made a motion to delete 
"or cooking" from the proposed new definition "Private Guest 
House". Motion seconded. Building Inspector, Allen Fraser 
supports the article as written. Motion to amend failed by voice 
vote. 

Mrs. Savoie answered another question on Industrial Waste. 
On a hand count, the main motion as amended by the first amend- 
ment carried 244 for and 2 against. 



ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to amend "The Protective Zoning By- 
Laws of the Town of Ipswich" as follows: 

a.) by deleting SECTION IV . A. Type of Districts "#9. Wetlands 
(W) Districts" in its entirety and by renumbering ##10-12 as ##9- 
11, respectively; 

b.) by deleting the two sentences after SECTION IV . A. Type of 
Districts #12. which read "The provisions applicable to the 
Wetlands District shall be considered as overlaying other zoning 

-51- 



districts. In those areas where the Wetlands District overlays 
another zoning district, the provisions of the Wetlands District 
shall be controlling."; 

c.) by deleting "SECTION IV B. Intent of Districts #7 which 
reads as follows: 

"7. The Wetlands District is intended to protect the public 
health and safety, persons and property against hazards of 
floodwater inundation; to preserve and maintain the groundwater 
table; to protect the community from the costs which may be 
incurred when unsuitable development occurs in swamps, marshes, 
along water courses, or in areas subject to floods; and to 
conserve natural conditions, wildlife, and green spaces for the 
education, recreation, and general welfare of the public"; and 
by renumbering "8." and "9." as "7." and "8.", respectively; 

d.) by deleting the words "Wetlands District" from the first 
paragraph, second line of SECTION IV . C. District Boundaries ; and 

e.) by deleting the entire second paragraph of SECTION IV . C. 
District Boundaries , which reads: "The boundaries of the Wet- 
lands District are hereby established as shown, defined and 
bounded on a set of maps accompanying this By-Law, prepared by 
the Autometrics Division of the Raytheon Corporation, Way land, 
Massachusetts, each entitled "Town of Ipswich Natural Resources 
Map, scale 1" = 600': and on file with the Clerk of the Town of 
Ipswich. The various Wetlands District are identified on said 
maps as Fresh Marsh, Deep Fresh Marsh, Tidal Flat, Shrub Swamp, 
Wooden Swamp, Salt Marsh and Pond."; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Master Plan Commission Chairman, Leslie Brooks moved that the 
Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich as presented in Article 7 of the warrant for the November 
4, 1991, special town meeting. Motion seconded. 

Ms. Brooks described the deletion of all references to the old 
wetlands district by-law as a "housekeeping matter". Planning 
Board, Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee unanimously in 
favor. Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to amend "The Protective Zoning By- 
Laws of the Town of Ipswich", SECTION V .D. TABLE OF USE REGULA- 
TIONS by deleting the subsection which reads: 

" RRA RRB RRC IR B PC I LI 

Power plant, refuse SPB SPB SPB SPB SPB SPB SPB SPB 
incineration and 

-52- 



sanitary landfill, or 
wastewater treatment 
facility for municipal 
use only" ; 

and replacing said subsection with the following language: 

" RRA RRB RRC IR B PC I LI 

Town power plant, 
wastewater treatment 
facility, water treat- 
ment plant, sludge 
composting facility, 
sanitary landfill, 
refuse incinerator, 
recycling center, trans- 
fer station, or any 

other treatment or 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 
waste related facility. SPB SPB SPB SPB SPB SPB SPB SPB"; 

and by adding Footnote #17 to the Footnotes to Use Regulations. 
Said footnote #17 shall read as follows: 

"17. By Special Permit of the Board of Selectmen, a private 
individual, corporation, or other for-profit entity may be 
designated to manage and/or operate a Town facility."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Master Plan Commission Chairman Leslie Brooks moved that the Town 
will vote to amend "The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich", as presented in Article 8 of the warrant for the 
November 4, 1991, special town meeting. Motion seconded. 

Selectman, James Engel proposed an amendment to the motion: 

I move that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law 
of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 8 of the warrant 
for the November 4, 1991, special town meeting, with the follow- 
ing changes: the replaced subsection's uses (all by special 
permit of the Planning Board as contained in said Article 8) 
shall read as follows: 

" RRA RRB RRC IR B PC I LI 

Town power plant; 
town wastewater treatment 
facility; town water treat- 
ment facility; town sludge 
composting facility; town 
sanitary landfill; town refuse 
incinerator; town recycling 

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17 


17 


17 


17 


17 


17 


17 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB 


SPB"; 



center; town transfer station; 
or any other town treatment 
or town waste-related 17 
facility SPB 

and by adding Footnote #17 to the Footnotes to Use Regulations as 
follows: 

#17. By Special Permit of the Board of Selectmen, a private 
individual, corporation, or other for-profit entity may be 
designated to manage and/or operate any of the above facilities 
on Town owned land." Motion seconded. 

Mr. Engel's amendment adds the word "town" to all the facilities. 
Board of Selectmen unanimously in favor of amendment and motion. 
Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried 
unanimously on the amendment. Motion carried unanimously on the 
main motion as amended. 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the "Protective Zoning By- 
Law of the Town of Ipswich", SECTION V . D. - TABLE OF USE REGULA- 
TIONS 

la. By deleting the following: 

"Bus and railroad passenger station and other transportation 
services"; and 

lb. By inserting in lieu thereof the following: 

"Bus and/or railroad passenger stations and any other 
passenger transportation services"; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board Chairman, Catherine Savoie moved that the town 
vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich 
as presented in Article 9 of the warrant for the November 4, 
1991, special town meeting. Motion seconded. 

Mrs. Savoie said inserting the word "passenger" clarifies that 
the transportation services are passenger-oriented and will not 
affect the small truck owners. Planning Board, Board of Select- 
men and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. Motion carried 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the streets known as 
"Arrowhead Trail Extension" and "Arrowhead Circle" in accordance 



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with the plans entitled: 

(For Arrowhead Trail Extension) 

Definitive Subdivision of Land in Ipswich, MA 

Applicant: Douglas Laterowiecz; 

Engineers: Hancock Survey Assoc. , Inc. and stamped by 

Frank C. Hancock, Registered Land Surveyor and 
Registered Professional Engineer; 
Scale: 1" = 40' ; 
Dated: December 1, 1982, and signed by the Ipswich Planning 

Board on May 17, 1983; and 
Recorded: Plan Book 178, Plan 55 at the Essex Registry of 
Deeds, South District, Salem, Massachusetts 

(For Arrowhead Trail Extension) 

Revised Definitive Subdivision of Land in Ipswich, MA 

Applicant: Ernie Delpero; 

Engineers: Hancock Survey Assoc, Inc. and stamped by Frank 

C. Hancock, Registered Land Surveyor and Regis- 
tered 

Professional Engineer; 
Scale: 1" = 40' ; 
Dated: September 24, 198 5, and signed by the Ipswich 

Planning Board; and 
Recorded: Plan Book 202, Plan 99 at the Essex Registry of 

Deeds, South District, Salem, Massachusetts 

ind (For Arrowhead Circle) 

"Arrowhead Circle" 

Definitive Subdivision Plan of Land in Ipswich, MA 

Applicant: Douglas Laterowiecz; 

Engineers: Ryan Engineering Corp. and stamped by 

James M. Ryan, Registered Land Surveyor 
and Registered Professional Engineer; 

Scale: 1" = 40' and as noted; 

Dated: July 30, 1985, and revised to November 14, 1986; and 

Recorded: Plan Book 217, Plan 100 at the Essex Registry 

of Deeds, South District, Salem, Massachusetts; 

Dr to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board member John Beagan moved that the Town vote to 
accept the streets known as Arrowhead Trail Extension and Arrow- 
iead Circle as presented in Article 10 of the warrant for the 
November 4, 1991, special town meeting. Motion seconded. 

4r. Beagan said the street has been completed and the Planning 
3oard was in favor. Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
ananimously in favor. Planning Board Chairman, Catherine Savoie 
said the Planning Board has served as general contractor for the 



-55- 



completion of these streets and has the co-operation of the 
residents in planting the trees. 

Motion carried unanimously. 



ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote to designate Lakeman's Lane as a 
"scenic road" in accordance with the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 15C. Said designation shall apply to the 
entire length of Lakeman's Lane, from Essex Road (Route 13 3) to 
County Road (Route 1A) ; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Planning Board member, Tom Mayo moved that the Town vote to 
designate Lakeman's Lane, from Essex Road to County Road, as a 
"scenic road" in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 15C. Motion seconded. 

Mr. Mayo explained the intent of the scenic road by-law and said 
the Planning Board recommends unanimously. Board of Selectmen 
and Finance Committee unanimously in favor. Motion carried 
unanimously. 



ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will accept legal ownership of a fee simple 
interest in Parcel "D", in the area of the intersection of 
North Ridge Road and Little Neck Road, in said Ipswich, as shown 
on "Plan of Land owned by the Proprietors of Great Neck, Inc. . . . 
January 20, 1985", recorded at Essex South Registry of Deeds, 
Plan Book 197, Plan 10; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectman Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to accept 
legal ownership of a fee simple interest in parcel "D", in the 
area of the intersection of North Ridge Road and Little Neck 
Road, in said Ipswich, as shown on Plan of Land owned by the 
Proprietors of Great Neck, Inc. .. .January 20, 1985," recorded at 
Essex South Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 197, Plan 10. Motion 
seconded. 

Mr. McNally said the 2,500 square foot parcel would allow the 
Public Works Department to enlarge the radius to improve safety 
in the intersection. 

Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 

Motion carried unanimously. 

-56- 



ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will authorize its Board of Selectmen to 
execute a lease between the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich 
and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, acting through its 
Department of Environmental Management, covering lots 3 01, 330, 
331, 332, 383, 384, 385, and 404 of the former Island Realty 
Trust property, in substantially the same terms and conditions as 
set forth in the lease recorded at Essex South Registry of Deeds 
Book 5317, Page 7 69; or to take any other action relative there- 
to. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town will authorize its 
Board of Selectmen to execute a lease between the inhabitants of 
the Town of Ipswich and the Commonwealth of Massachuetts as 
presented in Article 13 of the warrant for the November 4, 1991, 
special town meeting. Motion seconded. 

Mr. Wayne said the Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended 
renewing their 2 5-year lease on eight lots of property near Sandy 
Point State Park at Plum Island. The lease is for $1.00. Town 
Manager, George Howe said it was a good idea to keep "a small 
piece of the action" with the lease, while allowing the state to 
manage the property. 

Finance Committee member Geoffrey Hunt said the Finance Committee 
voted 6 - 3 in favor. Finance Committee member, Jamie Fay voted 
against renewing the lease and said the town could come up with 
some other uses for the property. He said "These lots are 
certainly something of value and 25 years is a long time to lose 
control. " 

Selectmen James Engel and Bill George urged support of the 
article. The question was moved by unanimous voice vote. The 
main motion carried unanimously on a voice vote. 



ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of the 
Town of Ipswich, "CHAPTER II ORGANIZATION AND POWERS OF TOWN 
MEETINGS, Section 4. Quorum ", by deleting from the first sentence 
thereof the phrase "The presence of two hundred (200) registered 
voters of the Town..." and by inserting in lieu thereof the 
following: "The presence of one hundred (100) registered voters 
of the Town..."; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Bill George moved that the Town vote to amend the 
General By-Laws of the Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 14 
of the warrant for the November 4, 1991, special town meeting. 
Motion seconded. 



57- 



Mr. George said the Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended 
this article. Finance Committee member, Constance Surpitski 
objected to reducing the quorum and said the Finance Committee 
voted to leave the quorum at 2 00. 

Angelo Perna encouraged more people to attend town meetings and 
urged to defeat this article. Recreation Director, Betty Dorman 
spoke in favor of reducing the quorum. Former Finance Committee 
member, Allen Swan pointed out that with the reduction, it would 
only take a small number of voters to approve major issues and 
urged voters to vote with the majority of the Finance Committee. 
Another member of the Finance Committee, Geoffrey Hunt, said the 
quorum is already low and when the issue is vital, the voters 
will come. Selectman James Engel expressed his point of view and 
said it was for the common good. 

The question was moved. Motion carried unanimously. The main 
motion failed to pass. 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote (A) to amend its action taken under 
Article 4 of the April 1, 1991, Annual Town Meeting (the FY 1992 
municipal operating budget) (1) by transferring a sum of money 
from the stabilization fund to offset a deficit in the federal 
general revenue sharing account, and appropriating the same 
amount as an increment to the "miscellaneous finance department"; 
(2) by changing the purpose of the remaining balance of the 
appropriation under article 30 of the April 7, 1986, Annual Town 
Meeting from "sewer system evaluation survey" to "revenue off- 
set - FY1992"; (3) by changing the purpose of the appropriation 
under article 19 of the April 4, 1988, annual town meeting from 
"...storm drainage..." to "revenue offset- FY1992"; (4) by 
transfering a sum of money from the Parker River National 
Wildlife Refuge payment-in-lieu-of -taxes account as a revenue 
offset- FY 1992; and (B) to amend its action taken under Article 
6 of the April 1, 1991 Annual Town Meeting (the Whittier FY92 
budget) by reducing the amount to be raised and assessed thereun- 
der; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee Chairman Bill Craft moved (A) that action under 
Article 4 of the April 1, 1991, Annual Town Meeting be reconsid- 
ered and amended as follows: (1) By increasing the amount to be 
raised and appropriated from $7,117,711 to $7,148,101 for the 
purpose of adding $30,390 to unclassified Miscellaneous Finance 
to eliminate the Revenue Sharing Deficit; (2) By transferring 
the sum of $223,537 from the Parker River National Wildlife 
Refuge payment-in-lieu-of -taxes account to "revenue offset - 
FY1992"; (3) By adjusting the "net to be raised and assessed" for 
the purposes of the municipal budget figure accordingly to 
$6,424,154. (B) That action under Article 6 of the April 1, 
1991, Annual Town Meeting be reconsidered and amended by reducing 

-58- 



the amount to be raised and appropriated for the FY92 Whittier 
Regional Vocational Technical High School operating budget from 
$126,660 to $116,780. Motion seconded. 

The Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen voted to recommend 
the article. Chairman Craft explained the motion and answered 
Ken Savoie's question in regard to the payment-in-lieu-of-taxes 
from the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. Angelo Perna 
moved the question. Motion to move the question carried by voice 
vote. The main motion carried unanimously. 

Article 16 

To see if the Town of Ipswich will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $46,000 to reinstate the Town of Ipswich in the Essex 
County Mosquito Control District; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Dan Deren moved that the Town vote to rejoin the Essex County 
Mosquito Control Project under the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 
252, Section 5A and Chapter 516 of the Acts of 1958, to be 
effective July 1, 1992. Motion seconded. 

Mr. Deren presented his arguements and the views of others who 
had signed the citizen's petition to rejoin the mosquito control 
project. 

Conservation Committee member Wayne Castonguay asked the voters 
to indefinitely postpone the article. He urged voters to give 
the environment a little more time to correct itself. 
Recreation Director Betty Dorman said this article belongs on the 
next town meeting warrant for the next fiscal year. Don Francis 
asked the voters to consider other alternatives and look for 
natural ways to control the mosquitoes. Lawrence Cummings noted 
the small percentage of area that was sprayed. 

Motion to postpone passes on a majority voice vote. 

Article 17 

To see if the Town will vote to reconsider any or all previous 
articles raising and appropriating money contained in this 
warrant for the purpose of completing a budget which is balanced 
and in compliance with the levy limit provisions of Proposition 2 
1/2, so called; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman, James Engel moved that action on Article 17 be post- 
poned indefinitely. 

Motion carried unanimously. 

-59- 



The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up attested 
copies thereof at the Post Office and at each of the meeting 
houses in the Town, by publication at least fourteen days prior 
to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper published in, 
or having a general circulation in, the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this 2 3rd day of September in the year of 
our Lord, One thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-One. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James R. Engel 
William E. George 
Patrick J. McNally 
William I. Walton 
Charles J. Wayne 



-60- 



******** 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
James R. Engel, Chairman 

What had been talked about for a number of years became reality 
in 1991 with a major reorganization of the municipal government. 
Strategic groupings of a large number of essentially independent 
entities operating within the municipal government, each 
reporting directly to the Town Manager, formed the basis of this 
reorganization. This reorganization had three main purposes: to 
reduce the number of individuals directly reporting to the Town 
Manager, to better serve the public, and to reduce the operating 
costs of the municipal government. Even with less than one 
year's experience with this reorganization, the Board of 
Selectmen are generally pleased with the results. 

One of the major changes brought about by reorganization has been 
the establishment of the position of Finance Director. This 
single position has overall responsibility for all affairs of the 
community associated with the collection and disbursement of 
funds - from all sources and to all vendors or suppliers. It 
provides the Board of Selectmen (and the Town Manager) with a 
single point contact in all of these areas. The establishment of 
this position, the filling of the position with an extremely well 
qualified individual, along with concerted efforts on the part of 
the Board of Selectmen to bring Town audits up to date, is seen 
as the combination of accomplishments necessary to prevent the 
types of problems caused by last year's significant reversal in 
the amount of free cash at the Town's disposal for budget 
purposes. 

In spite of the significant constraints imposed by Proposition 2- 
1/2 limits, the municipal government continues to deliver a level 
of services at, or nearly at, historically experienced levels. 
This major accomplishment speaks well of the professionalism and 
hard work on the part of Ipswich municipal employees and the 
continued dedication and enthusiasm of Town Manager George Howe. 

The Board of Selectmen has met with initial success in their 
trial of a Town Meeting concept which emphasizes an Annual Town 
Meeting in the Spring dealing primarily with financial issues and 
anticipates a Special Town Meeting in the Fall emphasizing non- 
fiscal issues such as zoning and other by-laws. 

******** 

TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

Nineteen Ninety-One could best be ascribed as a year of 
reorganization and financial readjustment for Ipswich's 
local government. As to the former, after several months of 
study, beginning in March, a series of reorganization 
administrative orders were issued, creating departments of 

-61- 



utilities, public safety, finance, code enforcement, human 
services, planning and development, and public works. By the end 
of the summer, the structural changes were implemented and impact 
bargaining was successfully completed with local unions. 

As a result of belated completion of audits of the town's 
finances for FY1988 and FY1989, we discovered we faced a 
shortfall in "free cash" in the order of $1.2 million. Over the 
next several months we developed a strategy to eliminate this 
deficit, which involved sequestering $670,000 in FY91 budgets, 
contributing an unusual $375,000 infusion in electric surplus 
funds, using some "new" federal in-lieu-of -taxes monies, and 
reducing FY92 expenditures. At the end of FY91, we had reduced 
our deficit to about $-115,000 and achieved a balanced budget for 
FY92, against a stated goal of eliminating the deficit entirely 
and balancing the FY92 budget. 

Our efforts to address the cash crisis were aimed in part toward 
saving our bond rating. To that end we had extensive dealings 
with Moody's Investors' Service, and were successful in 
preserving our "A" rating. In September, Donna Walsh, CPA, was 
hired in a joint appointment effort by the Board of Selectmen and 
the Town Manager: by the Selectmen, as Town Accountant; and by 
the Town Manager, as Finance Director. 

Allan Fraser was appointed as Director of Code Enforcement in 
mid- June. 

Newly formatted, project-oriented management checklists were 
instituted for periodic reviews of the department directors in 
the reorganized government structure. Over the months of May - 
September, extensive staff reviews were completed of draft zoning 
articles for the fall Special Town Meeting, hopefully to 
eliminate last minute questions. Collective bargaining 
agreements were concluded for one year terms, due to the 
uncertain fiscal situation in future years. 

The only significant capital projects undertaken in 1991 were the 
installation of the sewage sludge composting facility, located at 
Town Farm Road, and the installation of replacement water meters, 
using computer technology for electronic meter reading. 

Thanks are extended for the help and cooperation of all who have 
shared in making the reorganization work, and in pulling 
ourselves out of the fiscal hole we've been in. 



-62- 



******** 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - Charles D. Surpitski, Director 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Chief 

The Police Department was extremely busy over the past year. As 
the statistics below will indicate, the town and its citizens 
continue to be plagued by incidents of disorder and some violent 
crime. We cannot escape the problems that are so prevalent in 
the urban areas that surround us. A properly manned and trained 
police force coupled with the input and involvement of citizens 
continue to work well in making our community safe. 

The department has made great strides in the enforcement of our 
drug laws and prevention of drug abuse. Joining with seven of 
our neighboring communities, we formed the Cape Ann Regional Drug 
Strike Force in January. This is a proactive drug investigatory 
force that is unrestricted by geographic boundaries. It has met 
and continues to meet with success in bringing those who violate 
our drug laws to justice. The department has also begun an 
extensive drug education prevention curriculum in the schools. 
Through cooperative efforts with the school department, the 
respected Drug Abuse Resistance Education or D.A.R.E. program is 
being taught. It should provide long term benefits in providing 
our children with the skills to resist drug use. 

Finally, the Police Department became part of a larger Department 
of Public Safety. Strides were made in the delivery of all 
public safety services in a more coordinated and cost effective 
manner. Much remains to be done. 

COMPLAINTS REPORTED FOR 1991 

Rape 4 

Robbery 2 

Assaults 62 

Breaking & Entering 87 

Larceny 251 

Motor Vehicle Thefts & Recoveries 54 

Forgery & Counterfeiting 2 

Fraud 2 6 

Malicious Damage 254 

Weapons-Carrying, Possession 15 

Domestic Disputes 138 

Protective Custody 737 

Missing & Runaways 44 

Medical Aid 183 

Complaints received 7512 

Accidents 325 

Accident injuries 79 

Fatalities 

Warrants 179 



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******** 

FIRE DIVISION 

Willard Maker Jr. , Acting Chief 

In 1991 the Fire Department became the Fire Division within the 
Department of Public Safety, under Director Charles Surpitski. 
The transition has been smooth. Our goal is to greatly improve 
the operation of the Division and its service to the community. 

The Division is currently staffed by fifteen full-time and thirty 
part-time firefighters and Lieutenants. The Division hired three 
new full-time firefighters, and they successfully completed Mass. 
Fire Academy recruit training. Personnel completed 113 hours of 
Academy training, in addition to that provided by the division. 

The Division operates from the Central St. station with two 
pumpers, ages 1.5 and 12 years, one aerial ladder truck, and one 
forestry truck. Linebrook station is unmanned and houses two 
1966 Mack pumpers and a forestry truck. At least one of the Mack 
pumpers needs to be replaced. Call personnel assigned to 
Linebrook Station respond along with apparatus from Central 
Station to all incidents west of Mile Lane when they are 
available. 

The Division assisted the Water Division in maintaining hydrants, 
including checking for disrepair and those that would freeze in 
the winter. The purpose is to keep the Town's hydrants in good 
working condition and to find those that would not operate in 
case of a fire. 

We continue to inspect commercial buildings to insure fire safety 
of the buildings and their occupants. All first grade students 
were taught fire safety lessons by Lieutenant Durrell and 
"Sparkey" the Fire Dog. However, two local youths were burned in 
accidents this year, indicating the need for more education. 

The Division also teaches fire safety procedures to occupants of 
buildings with unique fire safety concerns. The Division raised 
$5,64 in revenue. The following inspections were conducted: 



Smoke Detectors 385 
Oil Burners 118 

Occupancy 13 



L.P. Gas 3 

Fire Safety 276 

Underground Tanks 13 



The Division responded the following incidents: 



Structure Fires 32 

Outside Fires 106 

Vehicle Fires 19 

Mutual Aid Fires 8 

Emergency Medical 12 2 



Hazardous Materials 31 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 73 

False Alarms 163 

Good Intent Calls 193 

Service 130 



-64- 



******** 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Harry W. Leno, Jr., Animal Control Officer 

The Animal Control Department is continuing to receive, 
investigate, and resolve issues pertaining to correct animal 
ownership. These and other issues involving responsible pet 
ownership and control continue to occupy a great deal of time. 

This year's improvement of the Ipswich dog pound was a new alarm 
system with two internal panic buttons and an audible outside 
alarm. Also, a purchase of a dehumidifier increased the comfort 
of the animals in the pound especially on hot humid days. 

The department continues to be supported by an active group of 
volunteers. Without their continuing efforts to upgrade the 
quality of animal life within the pound and in the community, 
the animals would certainly suffer more. The majority of 
the volunteers' efforts go without recognition and applause. 
They certainly deserve both. 

STATISTICS FOR 1991 



Complaints received 3809 

Complaints investigated 3570 

Dog bites 2 6 

Animals killed by cars 356 

Animals killed by dogs 4 

Dogs picked up 2 38 

Kennel licenses 3 3 



Dogs & cats euthanized 4 

Dogs returned to owners 2 38 

Feline complaints 789 

Citations issued 148 

Licenses issued 1173 

Animals adopted 80 



******** 

SHELLFISH 

Philip A. Kent, Shellfish Constable 

Thomas F. Dorman, Chairman, Shellfish Advisory Board 

The Shellfish Department continued to monitor our shellfish 
resources and make recommendations for proper use. It 
participated in a review of the regulations governing the taking 
of shellfish, which is an ongoing process. Environmental issues 
such as water pollution, predator control, and protection of the 
resource for present and future use were primary concerns of the 
department. When necessary, enforcement of the rules was 
undertaken and court complaints filed. 



The resource was abundant over the past year and, as a result, 



-65- 



The resource was abundant over the past year and, as a result, 
many clammers were issued permits. There were: 

107 commercial licenses issued 

143 family licenses 

129 residential licenses 

17 non-resident daily permits 

31 non-resident yearly permits 

7 non-resident over age 65 

As in years past, assistance was rendered and received from the 
Ipswich Harbors Department, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Protection, and the Environmental 
Police. 

******** 

HARBORS 

Charles D. Surpitski, Harbormaster 

David R. Brouillette, Assistant Harbormaster 

Over the past year, the Harbors Department dealt with the 
continuing problems of regulating our waterways. Major issues of 
waterway use among competing interests, enforcement of waterway 
rules, and congestions both in mooring areas and places where 
boaters congregate to recreate continue to be priorities. Due to 
the unique characteristics of our coastline, efforts to balance 
proper use with proper protection of the environment have been 
and will be studied and evaluated. 

Channel markers and docks were placed and removed at proper 
locations and times. Areas such as Pavilion Beach, the Ipswich 
River, and others that were in need of regulatory buoys were 
addressed. The Wharf continues to be heavily used for boat 
launching. The department worked closely with the United States 
Coast Guard and the Environmental Police of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts on incidents of search and rescue and proper 
enforcement of the laws. Whenever necessary, assistance was also 
given to other agencies such at the Trustees of Reservations and 
the Ipswich Shellfish Department in addressing specific concerns. 
The assistance and interest of private boaters and organizations 
continues and is appreciated. 

******** 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

David R. Clements, Director 

John T. Clogston, Assistant Director 

The year 1991 was a busy year for the Civil Defense department. 
Spring brought a major change when Police Chief Charles Surpitski 
was named Public Safety Director; this bringing Civil Defense 
under new direction and supervision. 

-66- 



Accompanied by Chief Surpitski and Acting Fire Chief Will Maker, 
Director Dave Clements attended a special hearing in Newburyport 
concerning evacuation plans for Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant. 

June brought an all-day event in Framingham, Massachusetts, the 
Framingham Expo, a Civil Defense Awareness Day, sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Emergency Management Association (M.E.M.A.), which 
Director Clements attended. 

On August 19, 1991, at 8:30 a.m., the Emergency Operating Center 
(E.O.C.) was opened when Hurricane Bob threatened our area. A 
State of Emergency was declared at 8:40 a.m. by Lt. Governor Paul 
Cellucci. Evacuation plans for Neck residents were immediately 
in operation. One family was hosted at the Doyon School by the 
American Red Cross. E.O.C. was fully staffed by Assistant John 
Clogston and his staff of volunteers. Telephones were manned, 
and a total of 30 calls were taken. E.O.C. was closed at 6:00 
p.m. ; a total of 56 man hours. October brought the Great North 
East Storm. E.M.S. was on standby for this storm. 

December 1991, the director and members of the North Shore 
Council attended an all day exercise at the Pilgrim Nuclear Power 
Plant for a total of 16 hours. 

Director Clements regularly attends monthly meetings for Area I 
in Tewksbury and the North Shore Civil Defense Council which are 
hosted in different towns each month. Ipswich Emergency 
Operating Center is open every Monday evening from 7:00 p.m. - 
9:00 p.m. at the Ipswich Middle School. 

The Auxiliary Police, under the direction of its new Captain 
James Melnyck, continues to ride in the cruisers on weekends, 
along with the regular police officers, as part of their 
continuing training program. 

******** 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS - Armand T. Michaud, Director 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of the 
following divisions: Public Works Administration, Highway, 
Cemetery /Parks Division, Equipment Maintenance, Building 
Maintenance Division, Transfer Station, Rubbish Disposal and 
Recycling, and Snow and Ice Control. Each division is charged 
with particular responsibilities relative to its duties. When 
additional manpower is required to perform specific tasks, 
personnel are interchanged within the divisions. 

The Public Works computer has gas records, rubbish disposal 
records, street work plan, and various other records on it. 



-67- 



Below is a summary of the work completed by each of the Public 
Works Divisions: 

Snow and Ice Control 

The Public Works Divisions combine their work forces during the 
winter months. The work consists of plowing roads, hauling snow, 
sanding, salting roadways, filling sand barrels, cleaning catch 
basins, clearing snow away from hydrants, and answering 
miscellaneous complaints. Other personnel assisting the Public 
Works crews during the height of the snow storms were from the 
Cemetery, Water, and Sewer Departments. This division responded 
to twenty-five different types of storms. 

Equipment Maintenance Division - Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 
All Public Works vehicles are serviced and repaired at the Town 
Garage. At present there are 55 pieces of motorized equipment 
that must be kept in good operating condition to insure its 
availability when needed. Operation cost records showing 
maintenance and gas/oil expenses on each vehicle can be 
ascertained from the Public Works Administration Office in the 
Town Hall. 

Building Maintenance Division 

Routine maintenance and minor repairs were performed at the Town 
Hall and Municipal Garage throughout the year. There was some 
repair work done on the roof of the Town Hall and also some 
repair work done to the furnace. 

Highway Division - Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division, which is the largest in the Public Works 
Department, is charged with the maintenance and repairing of the 
Town's streets and drainage systems. The winter schedule 
consists mainly of Snow and Ice Control and routine maintenance 
which does not require excavations. During the other three 
seasons, the men are kept busy with projects varying from road 
construction to street sweeping. 

Normal maintenance consists of patching streets, repairing the 
Town's drains, repairing sidewalks, and maintenance on all signs. 

All catch basins in Town were cleaned. Several plugged drains 
were cleared. New storm drains were put in on North Ridge Road 
and Masconomet Road. 

The following roads were hot topped: East Street and the 
sidewalk, one-half Broadway Avenue, Beechwood Road, Masconomet 
Road, and Upper River Road. 

Street sweeping was performed twice a week in the downtown area 
from April to December. All Town roads and sidewalks were swept 
in the spring to rid them of winter sand deposits. 



-68- 



Crosswalks, parking spaces, and traffic lines were painted in the 
downtown areas. As in previous years, the crosswalks were 
painted green. Also 142,239 lineal feet of center lines and fog 
lines were painted. 

All gravel roads were graded twice in 1991 (April and November) . 

Other projects included setting up voting booths for the election 
and setting up for the April Annual Town meeting and the October 
Special Town Meeting. 

Cemeteries/Parks Division - James E. Graff urn, Superintendent 
Routine grounds maintenance was performed in the Town's seven 
parks and playgrounds. Two hundred feet of fencing was installed 
at Gil Firman playground. A half court basketball facility was 
built at the Great Neck Playground. A new backstop was installed 
at the softball field at Bialek Park. A new roof was placed on 
the storage shed at the Bialek Fields. All ball diamonds were 
roto-tilled and material added to insure a safe and playable 
surface. 

All Town owned land such as the Commons and open spaces were 
maintained. The Cable Gardens area, formerly Cable Hospital, was 
turned over to the Town, and this area was added to this 
department's jurisdiction. 

General grounds maintenance was accomplished in the Town's nine 
cemeteries. Four hundred feet of new water line and four spigots 
were added in the Highland and Cowles Memorial Cemeteries. There 
were numerous diseased and damaged trees removed from several 
cemeteries. Brush and overgrowth was removed from the Old South 
Cemetery. A new section of the New Highland Cemetery was 
developed for use as two and four grave lots. Twenty-four 
monuments were reset. There were one hundred five interments in 
1991. 

REVENUE 

Perpetual Care $ 3,925.00 

Sale of Lots 4,850.00 

Foundations 6,201.00 

Tent Rental 1,850.00 

Openings 26. 110. 00 

Total $42,936.00 

Tree Warden - Armand Michaud 

Hurricane Bob hit Ipswich on August 19, 1991. The Town had the 
Highway ' Department, Cemetery Department, Water Department, and 
Valley Tree (private contractor) cleaning up and removing fallen 
trees in Town. They removed some large limbs and hangers. There 
were 400-500 trees with large hangers on them. The largest 
hangers were removed. At present there are still 25 trees to be 
removed that were damaged, and we also still have a log of 



-69- 



hangers. This work will probably be finished in the Spring if 
the money is available. We have applied to FEMA for 
approximately $75,000. 

Transfer Station 

The Transfer Station seems to be running very well. Recycling 

bins for cans, glass, and paper are on the site. Approximately 

350 people use this facility per week. There is an area for 

white goods and metals. Leaves and yard debris may be hauled 

there year round. There is a Salvation Army bin for used 

clothing. 

Sanitation 

There is a new policy that one large item (excepting white goods 
or metals) may be left on the regular trash day. There will no 
longer be a spring and fall big rubbish day. 

******** 

SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Laurie Veit, Cathy Col - Co-Chairpersons 

The Solid Waste Advisory Committee and the Town of Ipswich 
completed their first full year of recycling in 1991. A drop-off 
recycling program was held monthly at the Town Hall with 
newspaper, tin/aluminum cans, and #1 and #2 plastics collected. 
Drop-off recycling was also available at the Town transfer 
station for glass, tin/aluminum cans, and #1 and #2 plastics. 
Newspaper collection at the transfer station was added in July. 

Response to the recycling program was tremendous. During 1991, 
196 tons of newspaper, 67 tons of glass, 14 tons of tin and 
aluminum, and 10 tons of plastics were collected. Approximately 
800-900 households participated per month. 

In addition to recycling, several other programs initiated by the 
Solid Waste Advisory Committee helped to reduce the Town's total 
tonnage by 375 tons in comparison to 1990 totals. (A savings to 
the Town of $2 5,875 in tipping fees.) These programs included: 
leaf, brush, and white goods collection at the transfer station; 
the collection of office paper from the schools and town offices; 
collection of polystyrene lunch trays from the high school and 
middle schools; and the collection of plastics, tin, and glass at 
the Doyon School. 

The success of all of these programs has been due to the 
volunteer efforts of several individuals and groups. The Solid 
Waste Advisory Committee would like to thank the League of Women 
Voters, the Ipswich Garden Club, the Friends of Doyon, and SAVE 
for their repeated assistance in manning the monthly recycling 
drop-off at the Town Hall. We would also like to thank Armand 
Michaud for all of his interest and help. The transfer station 
looks great, and Armand has helped to make the recycling program 
in the Town of Ipswich an example for other towns to follow. 



-70- 



DEPARTMENT OF CODE ENFORCEMENT - Allan B. Fraser, Director 

DEPARTMENT OF CODE ENFORCEMENT 
Allan B. Fraser, Building Inspector 
Dominec A. Badalato, Health Agent 

Reorganization has combined the Building, Health, Sealer 
of Weights and Measures, and Zoning Board of Appeals functions 
under the Department of Code Enforcement and headed by the 
Building Inspector. 

Ninety percent of the records and paper systems have been 
reviewed, modified where appropriate, and computerized 
including the addition of a 386 PC in addition to our 286 PC. 
New tracking and enforcement procedures are beginning to show 
an increase in compliance over shorter time frames. More 
frequent and substantive dialogue with the Planning Board and 
Zoning Board of Appeals is increasing effectiveness. 

Ongoing training for the Health Agent who has assumed 
the Sealer's duties will be complete early in 1992. 



Building Division: 

CATEGORY 

New Residential: 

New Commercial: 

Residential Add & Alt: 

Commercial Add & Alt: 

Public Assembly Insp: 

Demolition: 

TOTAL BLDG . : 

TOTAL PLUMB . : 

TOTAL GAS : 

BLDG. DIV. TOT. 

Health Division: 
Licenses & Permits: 
Food Service 
Retail Food 
Septic Constr. 
Septic Haulers 
Septic Installers 
Swimming Pools 
Recreation Camps 



56 

9 

50 

12 

39 

2 

2 



FEES: 

Food Permits 

Septics 

Misc. 

Pools 



$2418.00 

$11455.00 

$988.00 

$20.00 



# PERMITS 

46 

9 

399 

13 

48 

7 

522 

134 

153 

N/A 



FEES 



$33432.00 
$5447.00 
$5813.00 

$44692.00 



Total 



$14881.00 



Inspections & Investigations 

Food Service 146 

Full Housing 35 

No Heat 2 

Trash & Debris 31 

Insect & Rodent 22 

Perc Tests 63 

Septic Plans 77 

Septic Systems 163 
Referrals by: 

Bldg.Insp. 12 

Fire Dept. 6 

Police 5 

Pools 4 

Water Test 42 

Misc. Complaints 68 



-71- 



Weights & Measures Classes - 15 Conferences - 15 
Recycling Meetings - 23 

******** 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1991, 59 petitions were presented to the Zoning Board of 
Appeals. There were 36 requests for Special Permits, of which 31 
were granted. There were 12 requests for Variances, all of which 
were denied. There were five appeals, of which two were 
reversed, three were affirmed. Six petitions were withdrawn or 
dismissed. 

During the year, Dana Jordan was re-appointed as a regular member 
for a five-year term. John Verani and Joseph Petranek were re- 
appointed as associate members for a one-year term. Bill Murphy 
resigned and was replaced by Arthur Sotis. Jim Theodosopoulos 
was re-elected chairman, and Dana Jordan was re-elected vice 
chairman. 

******** 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT - Elizabeth M. Ware, Dir. 

PLANNING BOARD 

Elizabeth M. Ware, Town Planner 

The Ipswich Planning Board witnessed a number of changes in 
1991 - changes which took place both within the membership of 
the Board but within the real estate market as well. Two 
members, Kenneth Savoie and Stanley Bornstein, who both served on 
the Board for approximately three and a half years, resigned from 
the Board. Thomas Mayo, a local architect, was appointed in 
March of 1991 to serve the remainder of Mr. Bornstein 's term, 
while John Beagan, a resident who served on the Board in the mid- 
to-late 1970 's, volunteered again to serve on the Board. His 
appointment became effective in September 1991. 

The lull in the real estate market has allowed Board members to 
concentrate more on land planning issues within Ipswich. With 
Special Fall Town Meeting established to concentrate on zoning 
and land use issues, the Board scheduled its work load over the 
spring and summer to prepare and present a number of zoning/ land 
use articles at this past November 4, 1991 Special Town Meeting. 
The Board's efforts and coordination with the Master Plan 
Commission, Ipswich Merchant's Association and Mitchell Road 
Industrial Committee were rewarded with approvals of a new Water 
Supply District by-law, a new sign by-law, and the re-zoning of 
approximately 3 00 acres from Industrial to Rural Residence C 
zoning. In addition to these comprehensive proposals, a number 
of technical "housekeeping" articles were proposed and were 
overwhelmingly approved by residents attending the meeting. 



-72- 



The Planning Board reviewed a variety of development proposals 
submitted to them over this past year. While the bulk of the 
proposals have been smaller subdivisions, (Pond Edge Lane, 
Palamino Way, Carriage Lane) special permits primarily for 
operation within the Water Supply B Districts and several site 
plan approvals (Carriage House and Santron) , there have been two 
larger, more controversial developments- Whispering Pines 
subdivision and Jewett Hill Special Permit- approved by the 
Board. The Whispering Pines subdivision proposed to create a 
connector road from the end of Pineswamp Road to Linebrook Road 
and to create 29 new building lots along the newly-established 
road. Due to an abutter appeal of both the Planning Board and 
Conservation Commission's decisions to approve, the project is 
presently in litigation. The Jewett Hill project, originally 
approved by the Planning Board as a 35-lot subdivision, was 
foreclosed upon by a local bank and was resubmitted to the Board 
in the form of a special permit proposal under the Open Space 
Preservation Zoning. The Board subsequently approved the proposal 
for ten building lots in exchange for the preservation of 34 
acres of open space. 

Preservation of open space was viewed as a key benefit in the 
Board's approval of the Ipswich Country Club project. This 
development, consisting of 235 residential units and a golf club, 
was foreclosed upon by its Maiden mortgage-holder in March of 
1991. Throughout the remainder of the year, the Board has been 
working with the owner and its representatives to resolve 
outstanding financial issues and to insure compliance with the 
original special permits and subdivision approvals which allowed 
the development to be constructed. The Board anticipates sale of 
the project in early 1992, and expects that the project will be 
built over the next seven to ten years. 

In addition to bankers becoming developers, the difficulties of 
the financing of land development projects has required that the 
Planning Board become subdivision developers as well. This year, 
for the first time in the history of the Planning Board, the 
Board voted to request a security be released to them so that 
they could complete a subdivision roadway. Happily, with work 
being completed by Town departments, local contractors and the 
residents themselves, the Board's involvement with the project 
has resulted in the completion and town acceptance of the 
Arrowhead Trail Extension subdivision. The Board anticipates 
that its role as "developer" may become more common for the Board 
and hopes that all subdivision projects are so successful. 

******** 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Lillian V. North, Chairman 

Although the number of projects in 1991 were less than in 1990, 
several of them were extremely lengthy and complicated. One in 
particular was the Whispering Pines project which took five 

-73- 



24 


37 


23 


20 


33 


21 


28 


26 


14 


7 


17 


12 


16 


10 


15 



months to complete and for which a consultant was hired. 
However, the Order of Conditions, which included 65 Special 
Conditions, was the largest ever written by the Commission, was 
appealed to the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) by 
an abutter. On December 27, 1991, the DEP denied the project. 
Several other projects are still on-going. 

The following is a list of the 1991 activity compared with 1989 
and 1988. 

1988 1989 1990 

Notices of Intent: 
Orders of Conditions: 
Enforcement Orders: 
Determinations of Applicability: 
Certificates of Compliance: 

After a great deal of time and effort, the Commission was 
successful in persuading April Town Meeting voters to withdraw 
from the Essex County Mosquito Control Project citing the 
possible hazards of malathion, the indiscriminate dredging and 
destruction of wetlands and the cost-ineffectiveness of the 
Project. The Commission was again successful at the fall Town 
Meeting in thwarting a citizens' petition to rejoin the Project. 
In both cases, the Commission was heavily supported by other town 
boards and departments. 

Preliminary work was begun on the Ipswich Wetlands Protection By- 
Law Rules and Regulations for which drafts were submitted by 
member "Chip" Nylen and which are expected to go into effect 
early in 1992. 

The Commission, under duress, accepted the resignations of long- 
time members (and friends) Bill Barton and Jim Berry. Replacing 
them were Brandon Boyd and Beverly Perna, both of whom have 
already contributed many hours of time and expertise. 

As in previous years, Commission members spent many Saturdays 
conducting site inspections and encountering the usual cold, 
sleet, snow, heat, humidity, rain, bugs, various animal species 
(both wild and domestic) , water, water, water and mud, mud, mud! 

******** 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Donald Curiale, Co-Chairman 
Marjorie Robie, Co-Chairman 

In 1991, the Historical Commission worked very hard to realize 
many of its goals. 

Commission members Mary Conley and Marjorie Robie continue their 
hard work in compiling and publishing their findings from the 
well-documented "Comprehensive Nineteenth Century Industrial and 



-74- 



Ethnic Survey" . Their newspaper articles in the local papers 
were informative, entertaining, and relevant to the local 
citizenry and to the Mill area of downtown Ipswich. 

The Commission proudly signed a new voluntary preservation 
agreement with the owners of 1 High Street, bringing the number 
of signed "Agreements" to 30. In May, the first "Mary Conley 
Preservation Award" was presented to local homeowners and 
businesses who demonstrated a voluntary restoration of their 
property. The winner of the "Award" was Mr. & Mrs. Timothy 
Mauser (Matthew Perkins House) . First and Second Honorable 
Mention were given, respectively, to Mr. Thomas Flynn (Sullivan's 
Insurance) and Joann Stanwood (The Wainwright School House) . 

The members of the Commission held a Choate Bridge Dedication 
Ceremony with the help of the Ipswich High School Band and the 
Choate Bridge Pub. An historic plaque was dedicated on our 
beautiful stone-arched bridge. 

In keeping with its goal of preserving the architectural and 
historic character of Ipswich, the Commission continues to 
interact with the newly created Historic District Study 
Committee. 

Finally, in December, the Commission was given the ultimate 
holiday present - a Town Hall office. Each member of the 
Commission is grateful to Town Manager George Howe for his 
consideration of the Commission's on-going needs. The Commission 
expresses its appreciation to the Board of Selectmen, the Town 
Manager, the Town Clerk, the Town Hall staff, and especially the 
townspeople for their support throughout the year. 

******** 

MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 
Leslie F. Brooks, Chairman 

The Master Plan Commission's efforts this year have focused 
primarily on the ongoing analysis of Ipswich's corridors. We 
spent most of 1990 and the first half of 1991 examining Route 1A 
from Lord Square to the Rowley town line and the industrial areas 
on Mitchell and Paradise Roads, which are served by that 
corridor. This examination resulted in a proposal by the Master 
Plan Commission to rezone the industrial land on Paradise Road to 
Rural Residence C, a new residential zone created as part of the 
rezoning of Route 1. Our rezoning proposal was presented at the 
1991 Special Fall Town Meeting and passed by a large majority. 
As part of its corridor analysis, the Master Plan Commission is 
also in the process of formulating recommendations for a Highway 
Business zone, which we anticipate will be ready for the next 
fall Town Meeting. 

In addition, members of the Master Plan Commission have worked 
with the Open Space and Recreation Plan Subcommittee, which has 



-75- 



been working on updating a five-year recreational and open space 
master plan. The final document, which is anticipated to be 
completed in spring of 1992, will qualify the Town of Ipswich for 
state and federal grants for acquisition and development of 
public open space. The plan will also outline Town procedures 
for acquisition and disposition of land, target areas of 
conservation interest, and develop strategies for protection of 
natural resources and development of active recreational areas 
such as soccer fields, tennis courts, and other needed 
facilities. 

The Master Plan Commission has had several membership changes 
over the past year and is currently mobilizing a new group to 
address development issues which have surfaced in Ipswich as 
various projects have been proposed and built. With a new office 
in Town Hall, we look forward to consolidating our records, 
documents and maps and to a productive year ahead. 

******** 
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES - Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

The Recreation Department continued its mission to maintain a 
variety of programs, services, and activities that enhance the 
social, physical, and mental well-being of all our citizens. To 
this end, programs were organized for all age groups: children, 
special needs youngsters, teens, adults, and senior citizens. 
Included were traditional playground programs, evening track, and 
basketball sessions, February vacation activities, adult 
volleyball groups, dances, community band, and many trips run at 
reasonable costs to the age levels involved. 

Community-wide civic and family events were also offered 
including the July 4th Parade & Field Day held in cooperation 
with the VFW, the annual Ipswich Marathon, the Triathalon 
organized by Rick Silverman, a Block Dance sponsored by the 
Cooperative Bank, a Halloween Parade and program, a Holiday 
celebration in December, and the Memorial Day Parade facilitated 
by local veterans organizations. 

Summer swim lessons continued at the Don Bosco pool site, and a 
later afternoon open swim time again allowed family use at 
nominal fees. Golf lessons for teens were again provided by the 
Ipswich Country Club, and tennis lessons were scheduled for all 
age levels at the high school courts. Children's Summer Theatre 
was again offered to those interested, culminating in a 
performance at the Winthrop School; and a series of kids arts and 
crafts classes were held at the Memorial Building in fall and 
winter. New programs included an Adventure Camp for middle- 
schoolers, a special needs summer recreation opportunity within 
the playground program, student aides for swim and playground 

-76- 



sites, and some teen dances and Sunday volleyball held at the 
YMCA site. 

Lifeguard coverage continued at Pavilion Beach, and several 
rescues and first aid services were provided. An evening 
supervisor at Bialek Park and attendants for the resident lot at 
Crane Beach were other department offerings. 

A committee of volunteer adults and teens led by Ang Perna 
repaired and refurbished the upper hall at the Memorial Building 
for use by many groups including a revamped Teen Center program 
on Friday evenings organized by Marcia Ford. A group of Young 
Life staffers from Gordon College repainted the Legion Room on 
the main floor. These projects were partly subsidized by some 
donated materials from Tedford's and Zodiac as well as a 
contribution by the VFW. A super slide at Bialek Park severely 
damaged by vandalism was replaced by contributions from several 
individuals and local businesses. 

Many local groups used the building regularly for meetings and 
registrations; and two dog training groups paid fees to conduct 
classes. The Recreation Director certified several youth sports 
coaches in soccer and baseball programs after evening training 
sessions, and issued numerous permits for fields reservations, 
tennis courts, and evening lights usage. 

The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation Director 
met regularly throughout the year to discuss programs, 
facilities, and policies as well as to plan for the future. 

The wide variety of programs and activities that continue to be 
offered are possible in part by the generous donation of time and 
funding offered by many local individuals, businesses, and 
organizations. Without such support our offerings would be 
greatly diminished in times of increasing fiscal constraint. 

******** 

COUNCIL ON AGING 
Winfred Hardy, Chairman 

A wide variety of programs for senior citizens of Ipswich were 
provided under the umbrella of Council on Aging services. The 
"drop-in" center on Central Street, open on weekdays from 8 a.m. 
to 4 p.m., offered reading materials, games, puzzles, 
refreshments, and informal gatherings for senior socialization. 
Two part-time hostesses, Mary Ruest and Ernestine Gillis were on 
duty there regularly. 

Organized regular programs at the center included needlework and 
crafts groups, bingo games, blood pressure clinics, and the 
"Silver Strands", a vocal group that performed for other senior 
groups. A writing group produced a cookbook and sold copies at 
Old Ipswich Days along with their previously done historical 

-11- 



narrative of Ipswich and frozen slush snacks. From time to time, 
speakers and special guests offered information on a variety of 
topics; and social gatherings were organized for holidays and 
other special observances. 

Trips and other activities available to senior citizens were 
publicized at the center, and tickets for Town-sponsored trips 
organized by the Recreation Department were sold there for the 
convenience of all residents. 

Diane Mitchell, the grant-funded Outreach Coordinator worked with 
seniors individually both there and in their homes to provide 
counseling on medical, financial, and legal issues, and to help 
them secure additional services they needed for such concerns. 
She also organized a Health Fair, vision screenings, 
intergeneration projects between seniors and elementary school 
children, coordination with the High School Honors Society for 
seniors needing housework help, a Vial of Life program, and 
speakers on issues such as Living Wills, financial planning, and 
nursing homes. Another of her major projects was the organization 
of a Friends of the Elderly group which raised funds to provide 
goods and services not provided in regular budget appropriations. 

Town contributions to Action, Inc. provided quarterly 
disbursements of government surplus foods items such as butter, 
cheese, beans, dry milk, flour, etc. Fuel assistance was also 
dispensed to those who are needy and meet qualification 
standards. 

Contributions to Senior Home Health Care Services provided 
support for elderly still living in their homes who needed 
homemakers or other kinds of individual help to facilitate their 
independent living arrangements. 

******** 
DEPARTMENT OF UTILITIES - Donald R. Stone, Sr. , Director 

UTILITIES DEPARTMENT 

Donald R. Stone, Sr. , Director 

In 1991, the Electric, Water and Sewer Departments were 
consolidated into one Utilities Department under the direction of 
Donald Stone. 

Electric Division - Donald R. Stone, Manager 

Generation at the Power Plant reached an all time high in 1991, 
surpassing the previous high established in 1989 by 10%. The 
1991 peak was 16,100 and was reached on January 22 at 6:15 p.m. 
Distribution continued a maintenance and upgrade program that has 
been established over the last eight years. The Department sold 
76,322,284 kWH, an increase of .91% over 1990. We saw an 
increase in the number of electrical services of 34, bringing the 
total number of electric meters installed to 5,929. The annual 



-78- 



study of municipal electric companies in Massachusetts showed 
that our residential rates remain among the lowest in the state. 

Water Division - James E. Chase, Manager /Town Engineer 

Charles Mantsourani, Water Filtration Supt. 
The year 1991 marked the start of an eventual Town-wide meter 
change-out program. About five hundred (500) selected water 
customers have had their water meters replaced with a recently 
developed telephone meter. These meters call the meter reading 
in to a billing computer in the Water Office on a regularly 
scheduled basis. 

One extension was added to our distribution system in 1991: 
Palomino Way 105' - 8" CLDI 



1988 



1989 



1990 



1991 



New Meters Installed 


71 




82 




70 




33 


Meters Replaced 


154 




181 




71 




326 


Services Turned Off 


98 




98 




73 




83 


Services Turned On 


135 




142 




152 




93 


New Services 


77 




58 




40 




19 


Services Discontinued 


3 




1 












Hydrants Installed 

Hydrants Replaced 

New Water Mains Installed 


29 
3 
21,750' 




1 
4 
730' 


4, 


8 
1 
r 045' 




1 

105' 


Total Length of Mains 


462,760' 


463 


,490' 


467, 


,535' 


467, 


r 640' 


WATER SERVICES 
















Metered Services 


3,852 


3 


,932 


4, 


,002 


4, 


,034 


Unmetered Services 


94 




87 




57 




56 


Summer Services 


15 

















WATER USAGE - MG 
















Dow's Reservoir 


122.666 


252 


.286 


257, 


.948 


260, 


.499 


Brown's Well 


91.946 


31 


.072 


54, 


.887 


74, 


.785 


Essex Road Well 


37.738 


15 


.525 


23, 


.190 


14, 


.268 


Fellow's Road Well 


40.356 


19 


.479 


36. 


.893 


22. 


.692 


Mile Lane Well 


21.617 


6 


.557 


19. 


.273 


18. 


.555 


Winthrop Wells 


31.225 





.712 


7. 


.438 


36. 


.770 


TOTAL WATER USAGE 


348.351 


325, 


.351 


399. 


.629 


427. 


.569 


Highest Day: 7/08/88 
Highest Day: 7/27/89 
Highest Day: 7/18/90 
Highest Day: 6/27/91 


2.413 


2, 


.004 


3. 


,061 


2. 


,282 


Sewer Division - Timothv J. 


. Henry, S 


uper: 


Lntendent 









Another step toward the long-term solution of our sewer sludge 
disposal problem was achieved this past fall when the Town began 
operation of a newly-constructed sludge composting facility on 
the former Air Force Research site at the end of Town Farm Road. 



-79- 



******** 

IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY - Eleanor M. Gaunt, Head Librarian 

Circulation 

Library circulation continued to grow during 1991, reaching a 
record 102,441 — an increase of 3% over 1991's 97,611. Of that 
total, 42,692 items were borrowed from the Children's library, 
and 57,973 from the adult department. Recreational reading 
amounted to approximately 50% of all circulation; use of the 
audiovisual collection was 4,420 items. We borrowed 835 books 
for Ipswich residents, and loaned out 1,824. 

The Library issued 1,19 3 new library cards, and current 
registrations now stand at 7,249: there are 1,639 children's 
cards and 5,619 adult. There were 510 visitors to the Archives 
Room, a level of activity substantially up from 376 the previous 
year. 

Collections 

New items purchased for the collection during 1991 were: 3,294 
books; 50 videocassettes; 56 audiocassettes, including books on 
tape, and 179 compact discs. At year's end, there were 64,513 
books, 1,549 LPs, 678 audiocassettes, 147 videos and 179 CDs. 

Also added to the collection last year were the following 
memorial books: "Wetlands of North America" in memory of Marion 
McKinney; "American Datelines" and "William Partridge Burpee 
American Marine Impressionist" in memory of Edwin H. Damon, Jr. 

With a generous donation to the library from Leonard A. Heurlin 
we were able to acquire a CD-ROM drive which runs off an existing 
office system; we then purchased a CD-ROM data base which covers 
some 1,500 full text articles in the sciences. The business 
reference and career planning collections similarly benefitted 
from this gift. We are indeed grateful for the opportunity to 
open up new means of access to emerging information technologies. 

The Board of Library Trustees voted to spend $19,000 of Library 
Incentive/Municipal Equalization Grant funds administered by the 
Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners to establish 
handicapped accessibility to the library by means of a new 
landscaped walkway and re-designed entrance. Additional trust 
funds of $9,412 were voted to complete the job. Bids were opened 
in November for construction to start in the Spring of 1992. The 
underground fuel tank was removed in October to "pave" the way 
for this project. 

Participation in the many programs offered by the Children's Room 
doubled that of 1990, whether afternoon crafts sessions, summer 
evening story times or various holiday activities. Pre-school 
story hour enrollment has grown to 125 children in response 
to high demand. Over 2 00 youngsters took part in the summer 
"Wizard Read" and additional programs of folk singing and puppet 



-80- 



shows rounded out the season the highlight of which was a visit 
from the "Caravan" in an outstanding program of song, stories and 
games held on the library's shady lawn. 

On-going annual events include the ever popular Chess and 
Checkers Tournament held during February vacation, and our "Get- 
acquainted" coffee for those wishing to learn about program 
offerings. The success of these programs is reflected in record 
breaking circulation. 

National Library week 1991 was marked by a Volunteer Tea to honor 
our 15 loyal volunteers who contribute 34 hours a week to the 
library. Their efforts are truly appreciated. 

Following town-wide reorganization in 1991, the Board of Library 
Trustees established a goals and objectives committee to develop 
short and long-range goals, and to> take on the responsibility of 
evaluating the work of the Director. 

The Friends of the Library continue to provide immeasurable 
support to the Library with their museum pass program, provision 
of the videocassette collection, and their ever-popular series of 
evening entertainments. 

Plan to visit your public library during 1992 and see "what's in 
it for you" ! 

******** 

TOWN COUNSEL - Charles C. Dalton, Attorney 

The year 1991 was a year of increased litigation for the Town's 
Legal Department. There was a substantial increase in 
enforcement activity, frequently resulting in litigation, by the 
Building Inspector, specifically in the Mitchell Road area. It 
was necessary to sue several landowners and tenants in Superior 
Court because of their refusal to comply with Cease and Desist 
Orders issued by the Building Inspector. With increasingly 
difficult economic times, the Building Inspector has found it 
more difficult to compel voluntary compliance with the Town's 
Zoning By-Law. The Mitchell Road area and Special Permits, which 
the Zoning By-Law requires be obtained from the Planning Board, 
were the source of several law suits, with the Building Inspector 
as Plaintiff. 

The Selectmen showed interest in utilizing the Town's licensing 
and permit granting procedures as mechanisms for enforcing the 
Zoning By-Law, initiating a policy of requiring that all original 
applicants and renewal applicants for most licenses and permits 
rendered by the Town be in compliance with the Zoning By-Law as 
an essential condition of receiving a license. In this manner, 
it is hoped and expected that the enforcement burdens on the 
Building Inspector will be reduced by a new, more thorough 
licensing procedure. 



-81- 



The Town continued to experience a modest and steady volume of 
claims against it under the Municipal Tort Claims Act, Chapter 
258 of the General Laws. 

The complete financial failure of a huge residential and 
recreational complex in the Town - the Ipswich Country Club 
caused considerable, ongoing, complicated, legal and financial 
confusion, involving the sometimes conflicting rights of the golf 
club, Planning Board, foreclosing mortgagee bank, individual lot 
owners, a future, successor developer and unpaid real estate and 
other taxes. It is expected that this project will finally be 
completed by 1993. 

The Board of Appeals continued to generate a reasonably constant 
volume of judicial work; many of these appeals by disappointed 
applicants or abutting neighbors arose in the Great Neck area, 
where a Special Permit is necessary to make virtually all 
physical changes to any of the homes on Great Neck, because of 
actions taken by the 1977 Town Meeting, rendering virtually all 
Great Neck lots non-conforming. A suit in Superior Court by the 
Conservation Commission alledging illegal filling and dumping on 
Town Farm Road was concluded in favor of the Commission by a 
Court Judgement ordering the owner to remove all of the illegal 
fill. 

The reorganization of the Town's entire administrative 
governmental structure by the Town Manager with the support of 
the Selectmen was substantially completed in 1991 with 
considerable legal input, and one unfortunate lawsuit, presently 
pending. 

The continuing application of the constraints of Proposition 2- 
1/2 to the Town's budget and finances, interpreting various 
hypertechnical limits, and the possibility of frequent overrides 
continued to generate considerable legal work pertaining to the 
mechanics of this 1980 referendum and its sporadic application to 
the Town. 

******** 

FINANCE DEPARTMENT - Donna M. Walsh, Director 

ACCOUNTING OFFICE/TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Donna M. Walsh, CPA 

As the Town's first Finance Director, I have found working at the 
Town of Ipswich to be both challenging and rewarding. Fiscal 
year 1991 was a very difficult year, financially, for the Town. 
Continued reductions in state aid and federal grant funds, the 
decrease in new growth, and the constraints of Proposition 2-1/2 
are making it harder than ever to provide needed services to the 
residents of the Town. Town Officials have worked closely 
together to find creative ways to provide services at the lowest 
possible cost. 

-82- 



At June 30, 1991, the Town had no free cash and only a minimal 
amount left in surplus funds to supplement future operating 
budgets. While the purpose of surplus funds is to use them 
during tough times, the Town is in a very precarious position 
with no reserves to fall back on if something unexpected were to 
occur. In addition, during fiscal year 1991, many needed repairs 
and maintenance (building and roads) and capital outlays were cut 
back or not funded. While this saves money currently, it could 
present an even greater financial burden in future years as the 
costs of repairs and outlays increase when they are not being 
dealt with on a timely basis. 

The next few years will continue to be difficult for the Town. 
All indications are that state aid will not increase and new 
growth will be low. We will all have to work together and be 
more creative to provide the best services that we can with the 
limited resources that are available. 

******** 

TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 
Virginia M. Cleary 

We began the year with printing our own excise tax bills. 
Previously the Registry of Motor Vehicles printed these. It is 
proving to be more timely and less costly for the Town to do its 
own excise bills, so this was a step forward as we look to cut 
costs. 

We were pleased that the previous year's tax taking was cut in 
half in 1991. Though this is a good sign, the economy is still 
depressed, and we continue to hope for better times for the 
taxpayers and the Town. 

Beach stickers continued to be a popular item at the Treasur- 
er/Collector's office with 5,631 sold. Because the residents 
were more familiar with the requirements, we were able to do our 
part in processing the applications quickly. 

The following numbers of bills were sent to taxpayers: 

Real Estate 10,412 

Personal Property 1,088 

Excise 18,000 

Excise Demands 5,000 

Tax Collector receipts turned over to the Treasurer: 
$10,783,670.08 

Treasurer's Tax Title Redemptions: $299,894.38 

Treasurer's Total Receipts: $32,710,148.86 

Treasurer's Total Expenditures: $30,527,886.23 



-83- 



******** 

ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property 
January 1, 1991, was $ 1,042,462,993. 

The valuation of the Town by Class is: 

$ % 

Class 1 Residential 915,205,300 87.79 
Class IX Open Space 

Class 111 Commercial 67,456,867 6.47 

Class IV Industrial 48,329,600 4.64 

Personal Property 11,471,226 1.10 

The Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 1991 was $ 10.05 per thousand 
for all property classes. 

********* 
TOWN CLERK 
Frances A. Richards 

Interim Town Clerk Frances A. Richards was appointed Town Clerk 
on June 1, 1991. Part-time clerk Elise W. Graves was transferred 
to the clerk's office on a full-time basis as of July 1, 1991. 
The Town Clerk has completed the first-year program for 
certification at the Institute for Municipal Clerks. 

As a result of the reorganization of town departments in 1991, 
the Town Clerk was placed under the Finance Department in 
September. 

Our new word processing software (Word Perfect) has saved a great 
deal of time and money in processing all the licenses and 
permits, preparation of the clerk's budget, and recording minutes 
for the town meetings. Recording, updating and printing the Town 
Census, voter list, street list, jury list, school list, dog list 
and all other lists requested from the Town Clerk's office is 
done on our own computer. 

As of May 1st, 1991, fines for non-criminal violations (dogs, 
boating and environmental) must be collected by the Town Clerk's 
office. 

1991 Population from the Town Census as of June 1, 1991 - 12,700. 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past three years: 

1989 1990 1991 
Births 
Deaths 
Marriages 



-84- 



136 


147 


150 


104 


101 


117 


100 


108 


70 



1989 


1990 


1991 


626 


570 


590 


66 


67 


57 


529 


552 


526 


32 


32 


33 



137 


154 


132 


71 


110 


145 


41 


93 


107 


36 


24 


33 
5 


8 


23 


19 



There were 72 females and 78 males born to Ipswich residents in 
1991. Of the total number of deaths recorded (64 females, 53 
males) , 107 were residents. Of the 70 marriages recorded in 
Ipswich, 27 took place elsewhere; in 20 marriages, one party was 
non-resident and in 14 marriages, both parties were non-resident 

Dog Licenses 
Males 
Females 

Spayed Females 
Kennels 

The 1991 census found 1377 dogs in Ipswich. 1173 dogs and 33 
kennels were licensed. 

Shellfish Licenses 

& Permits 1989 1990 1991 

Resident Yearly 
Resident Family 
Resident Commercial 
Non-Resident Yearly 
Non-Resident Yrly-Over 65 
Non-Resident Daily 

37 Lifetime Permits "Over 60 Free Recreational" were also issued 
to residents in 1991. A Non-Resident Yearly License for persons 
over 65 was approved for a fee of $37.50 (half the yearly fee for 
a non- 
resident) . 

Revenue Report for the Town Clerk 's Office - 1991 

Antiques & Old Metals Licenses $ 52.50 

Auction Permits 3,100.00 

Automatic Amusement Licenses 2,450.00 

Beer & Wine Licenses 6,750.00 

Booklets Sold 273 . 00 

Bowling Alley Licenses 80.00 

By-Laws , Maps Sold 1,010.00 

Class I Licenses 200.00 

Class II Licenses 1,900.00 

Class III Licenses 100 . 00 

Certified Copy Fees 5,605.75 

Common Victuallers Licenses 2,225.00 

Conservation Fines 25.00 

Dog Fines 1,280.00 

Dog Licenses 3,462.50 

Flammables Licenses 340.00 

Flea Market Licenses 180.00 

Liquor Licenses (All Alcoholic) 29,300.00 

Marriage Licenses 1,110.00 

Miscellaneous Fees 292 . 02 

One-Day All Alcoholic Licenses 4,760.00 

One-Day Beer & Wine Licenses 80.00 

-85- 



One-Day Sunday Entertainment Licenses.. 40.00 

Raffle Permits 100 . 00 

Recording Fees 4,466.29 

Seasonal All Alcoholic Licenses 2,000.00 

Shellfish Permits (1991) 28,105.00 

Shellfish Permits (1992) 10,155.00 

Sporting Licenses 8,248.00 

Street Lists Sold 1,142.00 

Sunday Entertainment Licenses 560.00 

Taxi Licenses 110.00 

Weekday Entertainment Licenses 900.00 

Total $12 0,4 02.06 

Increase over '90 Total ($105,610.10) - $14,791.96 

Sporting Licenses 1991 

Fishing 181 

Free Fishing (handicapped) 4 

Hunting 9 3 

Free Hunting (handicapped) 2 

Sporting 60 

Free Sporting (Over 70) 25 

Trapping 1 

Archery Stamps 42 

Waterfowl Stamps 84 

Wildlands Stamps 335 

Total 827 

Revenue sent in to Division of Fisheries & Wildlife $8,248.00 

******** 

ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

Board of Registrars: Peter M. Ross, Chairman 

Mary Maloney 
Edmund Traverso 
Frances A. Richards, Clerk 

Town Meeting & Elections for 1991: 

April 1, 1991 - 1st Night of Annual Town Meeting 

April 2, 1991 - 2nd Night of Annual Town Meeting-no quorum 

April 22,1991 - Completed Annual Town Meeting with 35 

articles 
April 8, 1991 - Annual Town Election with 1931 votes cast 
November 4, 1991 - Special Town Meeting with 17 articles 

The Board of Registrars held sixteen meetings to certify 
petitions and nomination papers, register new voters, check 
voters at town meetings, and check voters and tally results for 
elections. In November, 347 Initiative Petitions 
(A,E,F,G,H,I, J,K,L,M,0) were certified by the Board of 
Registrars. Joanne Banville was appointed again by the Board of 
Registrars to serve as Deputy Registrar at the Ipswich High 
School. 

-86- 



UNENROLLED 


TOTAL 


1007 


1940 


1111 


1982 


1034 


1690 


1057 


1855 


4209 


7467 



Registered Voters as of December 31,1991 

PRECINCT DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN 

1 436 497 

2 464 407 

3 325 331 

4 465 333 
Totals 1690 1568 

The Board of Registrars wishes to express its sincere 
appreciation to the League of Women Voters for all their efforts 
in getting a quorum for the final night of the Annual Town 
Meeting. At the Special Town Meeting in November, an article to 
reduce the quorum failed; thus maintaining a quorum requirement 
of 200. 

******** 

OTHER COMMITTEES 

THE IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 
Georgina Jill Traverso, Chairman 
Jon Aaron, Co-Chairman 

The Ipswich Arts Council voted, at a meeting on February 19, 
1991, to fund only the annual Ipswich Art Exhibit from the funds 
received from the Massachusetts Cultural Council. The amount 
granted was much less than that of previous years; and the 
Council felt that so little would be left, after funding the Art 
Exhibit, it would not be worthwhile to open applications to the 
public. 

However, several events took place during 1991, when recipients 
of grants awarded during 1990 presented their work. Exhibits by 
Rebecca Laughlin and Lynne Clarkin, painters, were shown at the 
Winthrop School, and both artists held workshops for students in 
the Ipswich schools. Claire Perrault also exhibited some of her 
weaving at the Winthrop School and gave a demonstration. Lia 
Gram, who was awarded a grant for writing, read some of her work 
and discussed writing techniques in an English class at the high 
school. The work of photographer Mary Caldwell was exhibited in 
the high school lobby, and the sculpture of Ashley Thompson was 
displayed in two Ipswich banks. Pianist Lenny Cavallaro gave a 
performance, which included some of his own compositions, at the 
high school. 

The annual Ipswich Art Exhibit was presented at the Middle School 
from July 26 to 30, to show the work of Ipswich artists. A total 
of $1,300 in prize money was awarded to James T. McClellan, Bror 
Hultgren, Mary Weatherall, Joan Frank, Irina Okula and Mary 
Pollak. 



Two exhibits also took place at the Hall-Haskell House. In June, 
a show of the work of previous grant-winners was held, opening on 
the day of the Ipswich River Festival and continuing until July 
20. On September 28, an opening reception to benefit the Hall- 



-87- 



the day of the Ipswich River Festival and continuing until July 
20. On September 28, an opening reception to benefit the Hall- 
Haskell House restoration fund was given at the beginning of an 
exhibit of works by the prize-winners of the 1991 Ipswich Art 
Exhibit. This show remained open through October 13. 

In December, the Arts Council once again made applications 
available for the new allocation of grant money from the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council, now to take place only once a 
year. Due to decreased funding, the Council voted to limit 
applications to Ipswich residents only. The decisions regarding 
the awarding of these grants will not take place until January 
1992. 

******** 

COASTAL POLLUTION CONTROL COMMITTEE 
Robert D. Cram, Chairman 

The Coastal Pollution Control Committee was formed in October 
1991 in response to growing concern about the effect of coastal 
pollution on the shellfish and recreational uses in Ipswich. 

The Board of Selectmen have charged this committee with 
investigating the problem of controlling fecal coliform levels 
and recommending remedial action. 

The committee is comprised of fifteen members of diverse 
backgrounds representing many interests and skills. Site groups 
have been formed to monitor pollution input into four major 
coastal areas. A parallel effort addresses the control of 
pollution sources using both existing and new technologies. This 
activity is being coordinated with a state and federally funded 
project under the direction of the Massachusetts Audubon Society. 
This committee's efforts will focus on local pollution sources 
while the Audubon effort will consider transport mechanisms, 
sources outside of Ipswich, education, and regional planning. 

******** 

HALL-HASKELL HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEE 
Stephanie Gaskins/Terri Stephens - Co-Chairmen 

The year 1991 was a very exciting year for the Hall-Haskell 
House. We, along with the Ipswich Historical Society, launched 
our first auction on May 4 under a tent on the Town green. Over 
2 50 items and services were auctioned. The senior high school 
class, along with students from the Middle School (SAVE PROJECT) 
sold popcorn and drinks. There was a wonderful performance given 
by Gerry Dolan, music director, and the Ipswich High Jazz Band. 
Our local auctioneers Bill George, James Grimes, and Norm Quint 
added color and Ron Zaccagnini, professional auctioneer, kept the 
momentum flowing. Window space at Hills, superb coverage by the 
Ipswich Chronicle and other North Shore papers, great calligraphy 

-88- 



by Sue Folksteed, and a wonderful outpouring of donations from 
local Ipswich merchants, Historical Society members, and local 
townspeople helped to make this auction a smashing success. The 
weather was glorious and most cooperative. The grand total 
before expenses amounted to $7095.20. Net - $6,275.20 which was 
divided up between the two organizations. 

We would also like to share with you our excitement regarding the 
house itself. First of all, the house has a new major support 
beam that was installed by Mr. Merullo's Industrial Arts Class at 
the high school, under the tutelage of Bill Thoen, structural 
engineer, on our committee. We now have electricity thanks to 
Eric Galicki. The windows are all in thanks to Mike Tolvanen and 
Bill Barton. There is a new bathroom thanks to Bob Linehan and 
David Humphreys. The Arts Council helped to clean and spiff up 
the interior so that an art exhibit could be held in the house in 
conjunction with the Ipswich River Festival. It was absolutely 
grand. The show continued through the month of July. Another 
wonderful art exhibit and preview party was held in late summer 
and continued into early fall. All in all, it has been a most 
fun, exciting, and rewarding experience for us all. It was so 
wonderful to see life again restored to this house. 

In closing we would like to guote Edgar Albert Guest, 1881-1959: 

Somebody said that it couldn't be done 

But he with a chuckle replied 

That maybe it couldn't, but he would be the one 

Who wouldn't say so till he tried. 

Thanks to everyone for your generosity and support. It is truly 
appreciated. You were all wonderful. 

******** 

COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
William M. Varrell, Chairman 

The year 1991 was relatively uneventful for local commuter rail. 
Although we lived with the constant potential that this service 
could become a victim of the State's fiscal crisis, the trains 
continued to roll, on time, with reasonable heat and air 
conditioning . 

The addition of many new double decker cars has almost doubled 
the capacity of many trains, with the somewhat alarming 
appearance that ridership has dropped off sharply. However, the 
T maintains that although not increasing as in the recent past, 
the daily volume of riders remains constant. 

At North Station, the recently reopened direct access from the 
train platforms to the station makes the occasional trip less 
intimidating for transient users. On the other hand, this 
committee must continue their arguments for replacement of the 



-89- 



inside ticket facilities and elimination of the excess surcharge 
for tickets purchased on the train. We feel this surcharge 
discourages transient users and is the biggest train robbery 
since the days of Jesse James. 

As in the past, one of the major contributions of this committee 
has been the planting of flowers and control of weeds at the 
station. Not only have these efforts resulted in a station we 
can be proud of, they have also resulted in the T giving extra 
attention to maintaining their Ipswich property. This committee 
is also especially appreciative of the landscaping efforts of 
those whose property abuts our station. Finally, we thank the 
Town for acting on our request to complete the missing link of 
sidewalk that now connects the station with downtown sidewalks. 
Not only is it now no longer necessary for handicapped users to 
travel on Topsfield Road, this sidewalk is used by many non- 
commuters and improves the appearance of the entrance of our 
station. 

Unfortunately, this was the first year that the flowers planted 
at the station were significantly vandalized. However, we 
appreciate the strong efforts of the police department who not 
only apprehended and obtained compensation from those 
responsible, but clearly demonstrated that such actions will not 
be tolerated. The damaged plants were promptly replace by this 
committee who remain committee to keeping the trains rolling and 
making the station a positive gateway to the community. 

******** 

IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Catherine Cecil, Chairperson 

Despite economic restrictions in 1991, the Ipswich Housing 
Authority succeeded in sprucing up its property and taking steps 
toward new development. The most visible improvement was the 
paint job of the apartment buildings at Southern Heights. The 
Housing Authority also adopted a policy with higher standards for 
maintaining tenants' yards, and removed all antennas from its 
buildings. The policy imposed stiff penalties for disregarding 
the ban on using the parking lot for auto repair, which could 
cause pollution of the water supply. 

State budget cuts affect the Housing Authority in several ways. 
State officials reduced the Housing Authority's administrative 
fees, as well as the rent levels paid to private landlords in the 
scattered site program. Despite the rent reduction, the vast 
majority of landlords elected to stay in the program. For their 
part, Housing Authority tenants responded to the recession by 
organizing a chapter of Project Share, which enables them to save 
money by buying groceries as a group. Despite fluctuating 
economics, the Housing Authority will continue its efforts to 
address the shortage of safe, decent, affordable housing. 



-90- 



The Housing Authority continued to move toward developing new 
family and elderly housing. The Housing Authority cleared 
another state hurdle in its bid to build 20 family units on 
Linebrook Road when a study yielded no significant historical or 
archaeological findings on the site. The Housing Authority also 
filed an appeal of the Ipswich Zoning Board of Appeals 
comprehensive permit for the development. Although the ZBA 
granted the permit, the Housing Authority appealed on grounds 
concerning the number of units and waste disposal. Although 
hearings were held on the appeal, no final determination had been 
made at the end of 1991. 

The Housing Authority's efforts to develop new elderly housing 
were suspended by state officials, due to economic constraints. 
In addition, despite past approvals of a Leslie Road site, state 
officials directed the Housing Authority to find a new location 
for 40 units of elderly housing. After a public site search, the 
Housing Authority signed options on two land parcels on Town Farm 
Road. 

The Housing Authority also worked to build a coalition of 
representatives of local government, business and human service 
providers to coordinate a new program that would enable public 
housing tenants to ultimately "graduate" from all subsidy 
programs. The program, which gained approval from the Board of 
Selectmen, is tied to the Housing Authority's efforts to obtain 
additional rental certificates for tenants who rent from private 
landlords. 

Joseph Brady joined the Board in November as the Governor's 
Appointee. Other Board members include Catherine Cecil, Robert 
Como, Sara S. O'Connor, and Arthur Weagle. The Executive 
Director is Raymond D. Daniels, Sr. 

******** 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Cynthia D. Quinn, Chairperson 

Recent accomplishments during the past year within each of the 
schools confirm that education is very much alive in the Ipswich 
Schools. This is not to say that we have achieved the ideal 
system, but to affirm that many educational opportunities are 
available to our youngsters. 

Within the schools, the principals and staff have started an 
undertaking to reconceptualize the role of the schools and the 
relationship between the school and the parents. Focus has 
centered on higher level thinking skills and identifying core 
values of individual schools. 



-91- 



Now numbering 125, the award winning Winthrop School volunteer 
group VIS (Volunteers in Schools) gives a great sense of 
community to the school, and the parents gain an understanding of 
what happens within their son's or daughter's building. Students 
are publishing their own newspaper and books. Cross-grade 
interaction provide the pupils with a variety of learning 
experiences. The teachers and assistants are enhancing student 
learning through problem solving, exploration, integration of 
subject areas, and a return to literature in the classroom. 

The Doyon School is also seeing an increase in the number of 
parents in its corps of volunteers. Through journal writing and 
the Young Author's Program, the students are extending their 
writing experiences. Within the school, many activities involve 
students from several grade levels. The hands-on science program 
here, as well as at the Winthrop, underscore and reinforce the 
science curriculum. Students have the opportunity to participate 
with other schools across the country in an Acid Rain project 
which is part of the National Geographic weather unit. 

Some of the latest changes implemented by the staff at Ipswich 
High School include Japanese by satellite, a new IBM computer lab 
which is utilized in accounting, keyboarding and word processing 
courses, foreign language activities that allow students to 
converse with other schools and countries, journalism using the 
computer, technology in music courses, and design projects in the 
Technology Education course. A number of Advanced Placement 
courses in math, foreign language, science, history, English, and 
art are still being offered. Instructional improvement has 
centered on problem solving, cooperative learning approaches, and 
thinking skills. Last fall, the principal and staff developed a 
mission statement, and the Ipswich High School football team won 
the Superbowl ! 

Recently, the Whipple Memorial School, also known as the Middle 
School, received national and state recognition for its SAVE 
(Students Against Vandalizing the Earth) organization. Other new 
programs include DARE (Drug and Alcohol Awareness) , HAWC (Help 
for Abused Women and Children) , Project Adventure, and a new 
babysitting course. This year the school hosted a conference for 
other school systems to view the very successful mainstreaming 
program that staff members instituted 8 years ago. As at the 
High School, Wood Shop has evolved into a Technology Education 
course with a focus on design and building. Some initiatives 
taken on by the teachers and administration include a number of 
programs all aimed at improving the quality of instruction and 
bettering the school. 

The school budget voted at Town Meeting stayed within the 
Proposition 2-1/2 guidelines. In order to provide handicap 
access to the Middle School, the voters last April passed a debt 
exclusion override for $150,000 to fund these improvements. The 
School Committee, through the Superintendent, have aspired to 

-92- 



balance what is needed to advance student learning with budgetary 
constraints and, at the same time, keep improving, not just 
maintain education. 

Administrators, teachers, and our support staff exert a profound 
influence on our students. Parents and taxpayers also play an 
important role in making the education system here in Ipswich 
work toward excellence. Clearly, the children are in need of 
continued, quality education. Through the educational process, 
we commit to investing in their future. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

Schools are the societal institutions that are expected to 
prepare us for the future, but we often compare how well we are 
doing in education to the past - not the future. Imagine a car 
traveling on a highway while the driver keeps her eyes "glued" on 
the rearview mirror to see where she has been. That's how some 
want to direct education. It is clear that our educational 
systems must move forward down the road and take our eyes off the 
rearview mirror. This is very hard; but, in the last year, 
Ipswich has made several major changes: 

1. Our enrollment continues to increase at a substantial rate. 
We added thirty-nine students from October of 1990 to 
October 1991 and expect to add fifty more by October of 
1992. 

2. Personnel changes include Becky van der Bogert's decision to 
take the super intendency of Lincoln, Massachusetts. Carolyn 
Davis was hired as the principal replacing Becky. Carolyn 
has exceeded our hopes in terms of providing educational 
leadership and quality management for the Winthrop School. 

3. During 1990, the school system reduced not only expenses but 
eliminated several important positions within the school 
system. They are: 

One High School Teaching Position 

One High School Computer Coordinator 

One Middle School Teaching Position 

One and One-Half Secretaries 

Four Library Assistants 

One-Half Position in Special Education 

Two High School Department Heads 

4. Changes in subjects include the following: 

The Writing Process. The Writing Process, which has been a 
strength at several levels, is expanding to become an educational 
strength throughout the school system. 

Math. The conversion of our math program K-12 to meet the new 



-93- 



national standards is approximately half completed. It seems 
slow at times unless we measure by other schools, and then it 
appears to be moving at a rapid rate. 

Science. The move to hands-on science is firmly implanted in 
selected classrooms throughout the school system. The Science 
Subject Area Committee is well along in defining outcomes and 
working on the implementation plan for schoolwide change. 
Progress is good. 

Readinq and Literature. Although state testing continues to 
identify this as an extremely strong area of our school system, 
we continue to improve with the formalization of summer reading 
programs and appropriate follow-up. 

Social Studies. There is no national consensus on clear goals 
for social studies. There are major changes taking place in 
social studies at the high school with the introduction of the 
American Studies course. We have also budgeted for a Subject 
Area Committee for the coming year to plan and implement our 
future development in social studies. 

Foreign Languages. Foreign language is an area of strength in 
our schools, whether measured by parent satisfaction or course 
offerings or rate of change. This subject area is rapidly moving 
toward the language goals of the 21st century. 

As you can tell by these six subject areas, we are moving 
education toward the 21st century with our eyes on the road 
ahead. I am proud of the changes we have made, our rate of 
change, and the clarity of the schools' vision for the future. I 
expect that in the coming year we will continue to improve and 
even surprise you with some accomplishments you don't expect. 

PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D., Principal 

The calendar year 1991 can best be characterized as one of steady 
growth: growth in our student population, in the expertise of 
our professional staff, and in the quality of our educational 
programs . 

The student population is now approximately 415 which is the 
highest its been in several years. Most of the growth is at the 
primary grades, and we added a section of first grade to 
accommodate the increase in enrollment. 

New to the faculty were: 1) Mrs. Patricia Harding in Grade One - 
Mrs. Harding has been teaching in the Ipswich Schools for several 
years, and we were delighted to be able to bring her to Doyon. 
Her degrees come from the University of Michigan and Salem State; 
2) Mrs. Patricia Rauseo in Grade Three (for a teacher on 
leave) - Mrs. Rauseo is a graduate of Boston College (B.S. in 
Elementary Education) , with an Associates Degree in Design from 



-94- 



Endicott College. She has taught at the elementary and the 
college levels and has an extensive background in elementary 
science; 3) Mrs. Maryanne Michon in Grade Three (for a teacher on 
leave) - Mrs. Michon is a Doyon faculty "alumna", and we were 
pleased to welcome her back. Other new staff members include 
Krista Erikson and Jennifer Pauli as special education 
Instructional Assistants, and Mike Andrews as part-time 
Custodian. 

Our program has grown to include the Won Way phonics approach. 
Twelve faculty members spent a week during the summer in 
preparation for implementing this innovative program. We are 
delighted with the results, and it appears that with Won Way as a 
compliment to our literature-based whole language instructional 
approach, we will be able to meet all learning styles with an 
accompanying increase in student reading abilities. The past 
year also saw an expansion of our Young Author's program; 
students "published" bound copies of original works, attended 
lectures and classroom presentations by visiting authors and 
illustrators, and participated in a "Reading Marathon." For the 
second time in four years, a Doyon student was one of the two 
Massachusetts winners in the National Young Writers competition 
(WELL DONE, Alison Turnbull!). In math, we continue on the path 
of implementing the standards of the National Council of Teachers 
of Mathematics with the emphasis on "real world" learning and 
problem solving. We are especially pleased with the growth of 
the school store project which now involves many students from 
Grades Four and Five. In science, we have begun using technology 
to enhance the "hands-on" curriculum. We have a new 15 volume 
laser disc science collection as a visual resource, and are 
presently using a modem in Grade Four to collect and share acid 
rain and weather data with other elementary students across the 
country. We were especially pleased when Dorothy Nicholas, our 
Grade One faculty science "expert," was recognized as 
Massachusetts "Science Teacher of the Year." 

Our deepest gratitude and appreciation goes out to the Friends of 
Doyon. With their help we have maintained almost a full program 
of computer and library classes despite loss of the library aide 
due to budget cutbacks. With the help of the Friends, our 
classroom volunteer program continues to expand. The Friends 
have also helped us continue the hardbound journal program (now 
up to Fourth Grade) , the Community Read, and the program of 
assemblies. They nave also made possible many other enhancements 
to our program. Other special thanks goes to the Kommittee for 
Kids for their fundraising efforts and to Leonard Heurlin who 
donated- two Macintosh computers. THANKS TO YOU ALL! 

As principal, I continue to feel especially fortunate to be 
working with a dedicated and talented faculty in a community that 
cares about education, and with such a good group of students. 
It was a super year, and our striving towards excellence will be 
just as strong in 1992. 

-95- 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

Carolyn Davis, Principal 

The Winthrop School student enrollment continues to increase 
necessitating expansion of programs, additional staff, and more 
parent involvement. The school presently houses 470 students 
with 75 staff members. The Winthrop School features a student- 
centered approach, challenging programs, and a caring 
environment. There continues to be a strong commitment to 
provide quality programs for each child in a positive and highly 
motivated climate. 

We are proud of and grateful for the resounding parent support at 
the Winthrop School. Our Volunteers In School program which 
received awards from the National School Public Relations 
Association has reached the highest number this year with 125 
volunteers. This program is of great benefit to the faculty and 
the students. Our parent organization, Friends of Winthrop, has 
made major contributions to the school this year. This group has 
sponsored several fundraisers which significantly increased 
financial support for the school in the areas of playground 
improvements, cultural and enrichment programs, after school 
programs, and instructional resources for teachers. 

Teachers have taken advantage of several professional development 
opportunities that have assisted in developing teaching 
strategies to prepare students for the 21st century. Our 
computer technology program continues to expand so that our 
computers can be centralized in a computer lab or decentralized 
into individual classrooms. Computer technology is integrated 
across all subjects. Other areas of professional development 
have concentrated on current math standards, hands-on science 
strategies, contemporary writing approaches, and a literature- 
based reading program. Our curriculum continues to emphasize an 
interdisciplinary approach to subject areas as well as relevant 
connections to the real world. 

The faculty at the Winthrop School continues to make a strong 
commitment to quality education. It is through the combined 
efforts and dedication of staff members and the generous 
contributions of Ipswich parents and citizens that make the 
Winthrop such an exceptional school. 

IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 
Barry W. Hopping, Principal 

The 1991 calendar year was one of continued growth and 
development at the Ipswich Middle School. Together with our on- 
going commitment to up-grade the physical appearance of the 
building, the staff took full advantage of available workshops 
and conferences as we specifically targeting the quality of 
instruction as our highest priority. The faculty and staff 
remain dedicated in their quest to best prepare themselves and 
our students for the twenty-first century. 

-96- 



Our academic, cultural, and athletic programs continue to 
flourish despite difficult fiscal restraints. Our new math 
program has evolved into one of the strongest subject areas in 
the school. As teachers and students feel more comfortable with 
this "real world" approach to mathematics, test results and 
student mastery improve with each passing day. Emphasis on 
inter-disciplinary instruction remains a priority as students are 
made to realize that concepts are no longer taught in isolation. 
Subjects are now more integrated and each child sees the 
connection between classes. Skills which are encouraged and 
necessary in one subject are utilized across the curriculum. 

As our facilities continue to improve, opportunities for 
additional hands-on experiences for all students are enhanced as 
well. In conjunction with the strong emphasis on laboratory 
science, our marine studies unit has grown to include Dr. Robert 
Ballard's "Jason Project" and interactive learning by satellite. 
Our special needs program and the philosophy of "immersion" 
which is based on total integration of special needs children 
into regular education classes, was recognized as an exemplary 
program by NESDEC (New England School Development Council) . In 
the areas of music and art, several Ipswich Middle School 
students were selected to participate in the Northeast District 
Music Festival as well as the Boston Globe Scholastic Art 
Competition. Our jazz band also competed in the Northeast 
District Junior High Festival in May. Forty-five students in 
Grades 6-8 participated in the Extended Learning Program, and 
many of the same qualified for the Johns Hopkins University 
Talent Search which is offered to seventh graders who score well 
on the California Achievement Tests. This allowed selected 
seventh graders to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test with other 
seventh grade students from around the state. 

Our athletic teams remained highly competitive as we again saw 
tremendous participation from all three grades. We continue to 
be one of the few middle schools in the area which offers 
intramurals as well as inter-scholastic schedule of games for our 
athletes. 

One of our most significant accomplishments during the past year 
was the increased level of parent involvement in the school. The 
Friends' organization again sponsored several forums dealing with 
early adolescent issues and concerns. Our parent volunteers 
assumed a greater and more specific role in several classrooms 
around the building. Our monthly open house sessions were very 
well attended. This allowed parents the opportunity to meet with 
teachers and discuss specific academic and social concerns 
regarding their children. In terms of working more closely with 
the community, our SAVE group (Students Against Vandalizing 
Earth) , helped to coordinate a variety of activities around town 
which encouraged citizens to become more active in dealing with 
environmental issues. 



-97- 



Clearly, 1991 was a busy year for all of us in regard to the 
number and degree of changes which took place here at the Ipswich 
Middle School. We will continue to grow and improve in all 
areas, especially with the on-going support and encouragement 
from the community. We are grateful for the opportunity to serve 
the townspeople of Ipswich, and we look forward with eager 
anticipation to the challenges of the upcoming school year. 

IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Stephen M. Fortado, Principal 

I am pleased to submit my seventh annual report to the citizens 
of Ipswich. 

The 1990-1991 school year began with 388 students enrolled in 
grades nine through twelve. One hundred and seven freshmen 
replaced the ninety-four seniors who graduated in June. 

The high school faculty continues to focus on preparing our 
students for the unprecedented demands of further education and 
the workplace of the twenty-first century. It is a bit unnerving 
to realize that the education that served our generation as high 
school students is inadequate to meet the educational needs of 
our students today. Low-skills, high-paying jobs have all but 
disappeared. We do not want our graduates to be among the low- 
skilled workforce that struggles from one low-paying job to 
another and through frequent periods of unemployment. All 
Ipswich High School graduates need to be prepared with the skills 
necessary for success in tomorrow's world. We need your 
cooperation and understanding to help us achieve that goal. 

Our students continue to achieve success in and out of the 
classroom. Our annual Science Fair had over 110 entries with 
winners going on to regional and state competition. Our Math 
League, Science League, and College Bowl teams continue to 
distinguish themselves in their competitive events. 

Fifty-six percent of our graduates went on to four-year colleges. 
Those graduates had average SAT scores of 503 verbal and 601 
math. The percentage of graduates going to two-year colleges has 
doubled from 11% to 22%. We are pleased that our efforts to 
encourage all graduates to continue their education appear to be 
succeeding. 

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the students, 
faculty, parents, and citizens of Ipswich for their continued 
support of quality education at Ipswich High School. 

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 
Elizabeth J. Geanakakis, Director 

Department of Special Services goals for the 1990-91 school year 
focused on the following: 



-98- 



1. To develop entrance and exit criteria and a process for 
determining Reading Reinforcement Services in the Elementary 
Schools. 

2. To upgrade the process and group skills at Team Evaluation 
meetings . 

3. To provide time and available resource to aid in the 
implementation of Phase II of the Curriculum. 

4. To continue to manage issues of outside placement for 
quality, accountability, and cost effectiveness. 

5. To work on the development of a Department of Special 
Services Handbook. 

Contributions to programming and our cooperation with regular 
education in striving for increasing excellence, is substantiated 
by the listing of the following activities and key events in 
which the Department of Special Services Staff were involved: 

- Presenter at North Shore Consortium 

- Active participants in Kindergarten and Pre-School Screening 
Team Teaching (Special Ed. and Regular Teacher) in seven 
classes at the high school 

- Increased English as Second Language tutoring 

- Conducted Pre-School Parent Groups one and one-half hours 
weekly 

Wrote three Lucretia Crocker Grants (2) funded, Oral History 

and Whole Language 

Co-Directed Summer Reading Program 

Supervised Student Teachers 

- Led Great Books Group (12 sessions) 

- Involved in Student Assistant Program 
Coordinated Kids page Salem News 

- SPED Teacher accepted for Fulbright Exchange 
Co-Chair of Friends of Winthrop 

- Video taped Pre-Schoolers as teaching aid for parents 

- Integrated 5th graders as helpers in pre-school classes 

- Presented Reading Reinforcement Program to Administrative 
Council and Process Improvement Committee 

Supervised Middle School Student as helper in Intermediate 

Class 

Organized and ran a booth at Christmas Fair 

Organized: 

Parents' night of Grade 5 and Middle School students 

Health Fair for Teachers 

- Open Forum for Parents, "Talking to your Children 
About Sex" 

Health Fair for Middle School students 

Stranger Awareness Program 

Taught CPR Course to 9th graders 

Nomination of Teacher of the Year in Special Education 

Presenter - Delegation of Care in Public School Setting 

Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing 

- Editor MSNO Newsletter 

Conducted Drama workshop at Doyon (6 weeks) 

- Utilized Senior Volunteers in class 

-99- 



Students in the Life Skills Class were placed in part-time 
supervised jobs within the community. 

Of particular honor, was the choice by NESDEC to have the Special 
Education and Regular class teachers at the Middle School present 
a workshop on Mainstreaming to 35 participants from all over the 
state. Our delivery of service model was used as a model. 

New Programs 

Through minimal construction and intensive planning by staff, we 
were able to move a Primary SPED class to Doyon - this class 
covers grades Kindergarten through Grade 2. Three outside 
students have tuitioned into this class. This class was made 
Collaborative . 

A new Collaborative Middle School Class was started September 
1990. These students in the past had been tuitioned outside the 
Ipswich system to other collaborative classes. Numbers deemed it 
cost effective. Two outside students have tuitioned into this 
class. 

The Intermediate SPED Class was reverted from a Collaborative to 
an Ipswich class (exchanging with Primary Class) . This class 
based at Winthrop School, ideally covers students in Grades 3 - 
5. This year, because of circumstances of placement and 
continuity, programming is covering Grades 1-4. Three outside 
students were tuitioned into this class. 



During the 1990-91 school year, the following took place: 
Number of : 

New referrals for Team Evaluation 64 

Team evaluations that resulted in new 

or continued placement 41 

Team evaluations that resulted in NO 

placement 2 3 

Team re-evaluations of Individual Student 

Programs 93 

Annual review of Individual Student 

Programs 175 

Screening of: 

3 year olds 44 

4 year olds 33 
Kindergarten 142 

Total number of Special Needs Students serviced '90-91 306 
Number of Special Needs Students completing program 

goals 19 

Number of Special Needs Students graduating 14 

Members of the newly formed SPED Improvement Model Committee 
addressed quality and need for services within Ipswich vs. 



-100- 



outside placement and studied evaluation and placement processes 
and procedures in preparation for new Special Education 
Regulation to be promulgated September 1991. 

******** 

WHITTIER REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 
Karen H. Prentice, Superintendent/Director 
Eugene A. Hailson, Ipswich Representative 

Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School is entering 
its nineteenth year. To date, we have graduated 4,858 students 
from a regular day school program and 672 students from our post 
secondary courses. 



The enrollment for the Evening School from your community: 
The October 1, 1990, Day School Enrollment: 

Boys Girls 



16 



Grade 9 
Grade 10 
Grade 11 
Grade 12 



1991 Graduates: 



Total - 24 



The cost to your community for the school year 1990-1991 was 
$121,645. 

******** 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
REVENUE SHARING HANDICAPPED REGULATIONS 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section 
51.55 of the Revenue Sharing Regulations, as published in the 
Federal Register on October 17, 1983. Section 51.55 prohibits 
discrimination against qualified individuals because of their 
handicapped status. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advised the public, 
employees, and job applicants that it does not discriminate on 
the basis of handicapped status in admission or access to, or 
treatment, or employment in its programs and activities. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or 
office) as the contact to coordinate efforts to comply with this 
requirement. 



-101- 



Inquiries should be directed to: 



Name: 

Office: 

Address: 

Phone Number 
Hours : 



George E. Howe 

Town Manager 

Town Hall, South Main Street 

Ipswich, MA 01938 

(508)356-4848 

8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Mondays 

8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Tues. - 

Thurs . 
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Fridays 



-102- 



SCHEDULE II 
EXPENDITURES 

iuly-1 199Q - Ju ne 3Q, 1991 
Taxes 

Town of Ipswich 274,931.60 

Repairs & Upkeep 

Wharf & Docks 2,753.00 

Playgrounds 1,345.00 

Tree & Brush Work 2,656.00 

Speed Bumps & Road Repair 2,885.00 

Maintenance 2,150.25 

Salaries & Expenses 

Salaries 5,500.00 

Transportation 500.00 

Police 5,357.55 

Office Supplies 597.75 

Meetings 130.30 

Telephone 192.43 

Loan Payments 8,000.00 

Loan Interest 678.57 

Insurance 16 r 611Q0 

32128&45 



-103- 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Balance, July 1, 1990 
Cash Received 
Expenditures 
Balance, June 30, 1991 



11,767.80 
356,012.08 
324,288.45 

43,491.43 



Little Neck, Land Valuation 
Buildings - Community Center & Barn 
Cash in First National Bank of Ipswich 
On Deposit - Ipswich Co-operative Bank 



18,371,700.00 

75,600.00 

43,491.43 

ZQ P Q. QQ 



18,492 f 791.43 



Building & Land Taxes 
Rents 



SCHEDULE I 

CAS H R ECEIPTS 

JnLy_l, 199Q - June 3 0, 1991 



274,931.60 
81 r 080.48 



356 ,012.08 



SCHEDULE A 
RECONCILIATION OF CASH RECEIPTS 
Balance, July 1, 1990 
Cash Receipts - Schedule I 

Expenditures - Schedule II 



11,767.80 
356,012.08 
367,779.88 
324.288.45 

43,491.43 



-104- 



TRUSTEES OF THE IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STATEMENT OF FUND ACTIVITY 

July 1, 1990 to June 30, 1991 



I. BOOK FUND AND MEMORIAL FUNDS 

Balance - July 1, 1990 

Contributions : 
Interest Income: 
Expenditures : 

Books 

CD Display Rack 

Balance - June 30, 1991 



$12,666.29 

3,118.00 
680.50 

(1,353.00) 
(346.00) 

$14,765.79 



II. IPSWICH SPEAKS FUND 

Balance - July 1, 1990 

Interest Income: 
Balance - June 30, 1991 



$ 1,184.78 

78.22 

$ 1,263.00 



III. LIBRARY TRUST FUND 

Balance July 1, 1990 

Interest Income 

Balance - June 30, 1991 

Augustine Heard Fund 
Elizabeth R. Lathrop Fund 
Adelade B. Lockhart Fund 
Abby L. Nev^man Fund 
George Spiller Fund 
Daniel Treadwell Fund 



$11,626.27 

1,450.06 

714.92 

4,349.50 

1,224.12 

28,202.65 



$ 43,522.52 
4,045.00 



$47,567.52 



-105 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

Balance on hand January 1, 1991 $31,619.06 

Income from funds for year 1991 as follows: 
Interest: Ipswich Co-Operative Bank 

Money Market Certificate 2 , 789 . 24 

Expenditure for the year 1991 as follows: 

Friends of the Ipswich Public Library 800.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1992, as follows: 

Ipswich Co-Operative Bank Money Market $3 3 , 608 . 30 



-106- 



ACCOUNTANT'S REPORT 
Receipts - Fiscal Year 1991 
General Fund 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES-1991 $102,964 

-1990 $3 r 133 

-1989 $206 

-1988 ($985) 

-1987 $108 

TOTAL PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES $105,426 

REAL ESTATE TAXES-1991 $9,783,214 

-1990 $81,148 

-1989 ($18) 

-1988 $124 

-1987 $123 

TOTAL REAL ESTATE TAXES $9,864,591 

TOTAL PERSONAL & RE TAXES $9,970,017 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE-1991 $367,883 

-1990 $182,259 

-1989 $63,854 

-1988 $244 

-1987 $217 

-1986 $556 

-1985 $157 

-1984 $1,422 

TOTAL MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE $616,592 

BOAT EXCISE TAXES $26,526 

PENALTIES & INTEREST ON TAXES 

INTEREST ON TAXES $77,697 

DEMANDS $20,885 

TOTAL PEN & INT ON TAXES $98,582 

PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES $46,912 

DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE 

TOWN PROPERTY $274 

LIEN CERTIFICATES $15,825 

MISCELLANEOUS $21,030 

TOTAL DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE $37,129 



-107- 



FEES 

DEPARTMENTAL -LIBRARY 

DEPARTMENTAL-CEMETARY 

DEPARTMENTAL -RECREATION 

RENTALS 

LICENSES & PERMITS 
GENERAL 
DOG 
FISH & WILDLIFE 

LAUNCH 

DISPOSAL 

HEALTH 

STREET OPENINGS 

SEWER INSTALLATION 

BLDG INSPECTOR 

FIRE/BURNING 

PISTOL/FID 

MOORING 

MISCELLANEOUS 

TOTAL LICENSES & PERMITS 

INTEREST ON INVESTMENTS 

FINES & FORFEITS 
COURT 
PARKING 
LIBRARY 

TOTAL FINES & FORFEITS 

REFUNDS 

GENERAL 

TOTAL REFUNDS 

CHOATE BRIDGE REIMBURSEMENT 



$57, 1 55 

S1..349 
$ 3 5 ..593 
$17,834 
$12,982 



$96, 310 

$288 

$0 

$826 

$6, 382 

$6, 150 

$1... 580 

$200 

$44, 312 

$3..939 

$2,745 

$26,969 

$7,084 

$196,785 

$128,540 



$72,152 

$15,955 

$4,393 

$92,500 



$11,748 
$11,748 

$9,905 



-108- 



STATE RECEIPTS 

ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE $1,532,997 

VETERANS CLAUSE $27,499 

REIMBURSEMENT - BLIND $1,050 

ELDERLY ABATEMENT $16,946 

POLICE CAREER INCENTIVE $23,400 

VETERANS BENEFITS $114,841 

LOCAL AID - LOTTERY $434,439 

SCHOOL CHAPTER 70 $502,179 

SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION $120,160 

SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION AID $169,268 

TUITION OF STATE WARDS $21,195 

TOTAL STATE RECEIPTS $2,963,974 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 

INTEREST ON TAXES $292 

WATER BETTERMENT $7 5 

SEWER BETTERMENT $4,765 

STREET BETTERMENT $653 

STREET COMM INTEREST $8,021 

STREET BETTERMENT ADD $106 

TOTAL SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS $13,912 

TOTAL $14, 340, 035 



Sewer Fund 

SEWER REVENUE 

USER CHARGES $394,150 

SEWER ADDED TO TAX $13,254 

TOTAL SEWER REVENUE $407,404 

Water Fund 
WATER REVENUE 

USER CHARGES $935,065 

WATER ADDED TO TAX $2,975 

TOTAL WATER REVEUNUE $938,040 



-109- 



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NOTES 







NOTES 



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